Childhood and adulthood socio-economic position and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study

Heshmati, Amy, Mishra, Gita and Koupil, Ilona (2013) Childhood and adulthood socio-economic position and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 67 11: 939-946. doi:10.1136/jech-2012-202149


Author Heshmati, Amy
Mishra, Gita
Koupil, Ilona
Title Childhood and adulthood socio-economic position and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study
Journal name Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0143-005X
1470-2738
Publication date 2013-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/jech-2012-202149
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 67
Issue 11
Start page 939
End page 946
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Childhood and adulthood socio-economic position (SEP) is associated with cardiovascular disease in later life, but associations with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are not well established.

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of childhood and adulthood SEP with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension and preeclampsia/ eclampsia). Method: Study participants were Swedish women (n=9507) from generation 3 of the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (UBCoS Multigen) who delivered a live singleton offspring between 1982 and 2008. Social and health data were obtained from routine Swedish registers. Associations of own education (adulthood SEP), and parental education and social class (childhood SEP) with hypertensive disorders were studied using logistic regression with adjustments for age, calendar period, parity, smoking and body mass index.

Results: Low own education was associated with chronic hypertension, but not with gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia/eclampsia. Increased risk of chronic hypertension was seen in women whose mothers had medium education compared with women whose mothers had high education (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.62). Women from a manual social class during childhood had twice the risk of chronic hypertension compared with those from non-manual backgrounds (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.75). Childhood SEP was not associated with gestational hypertension or preeclampsia/ eclampsia.

Conclusions: Childhood and adulthood SEP was associated with chronic hypertension in pregnancy. In contrast, no association with childhood or adulthood SEP was seen for gestational hypertension or pre-eclampsia/ eclampsia.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Public Health Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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