Mental health issues decrease diabetes-specific quality of life independent of glycaemic control and complications: findings from Australia's Living With Diabetes cohort study

Donald, Maria, Dower, Jo, Coll, Joseph R., Baker, Peter, Mukandi, Bryan and Doi, Suhail A. R. (2013) Mental health issues decrease diabetes-specific quality of life independent of glycaemic control and complications: findings from Australia's Living With Diabetes cohort study. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 11 170: 1-8. doi:10.1186/1477-7525-11-170


Author Donald, Maria
Dower, Jo
Coll, Joseph R.
Baker, Peter
Mukandi, Bryan
Doi, Suhail A. R.
Title Mental health issues decrease diabetes-specific quality of life independent of glycaemic control and complications: findings from Australia's Living With Diabetes cohort study
Journal name Health and Quality of Life Outcomes   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-7525
Publication date 2013-10-16
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1477-7525-11-170
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 11
Issue 170
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background While factors associated with health-related quality of life for people with chronic diseases including diabetes are well researched, far fewer studies have investigated measures of disease-specific quality of life. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of complications and comorbidities on diabetes-specific quality of life in a large population-based cohort of type 2 diabetic patients.

Methods The Living with Diabetes Study recruited participants from the National Diabetes Services Scheme in Australia. Data were collected via a mailed self-report questionnaire. Diabetes-specific quality of life was measured using the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL) questionnaire. The analyses are for 3609 patients with type 2 diabetes. Regression models with adjustment for control variables investigated the association of complications and comorbidities with diabetes-specific quality of life. Next, the most parsimonious model for diabetes-specific quality of life after controlling for important covariates was examined.

Results The expected associations with better diabetes-specific quality of life were evident, such as increased income, not on insulin, better glycaemic control and older age. However, being single and having been diagnosed with cancer were also associated with better ADDQoL. Additionally, poorer diabetes-specific quality of life was strongly sensitive to the presence of diabetes complications and mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia. These relationships persisted after adjustment for gender, age, duration of diabetes, treatment regimen, sampling region and other treatment and socio-demographic variables.

Conclusions A greater appreciation of the complexities of diabetes-specific quality of life can help tailor disease management and self-care messages given to patients. Attention to mental health issues may be as important as focusing on glycaemic control and complications. Therefore clinicians’ ability to identify and mange mental health issues and/or refer patients is critical to improving patients’ diabetes-specific quality of life.
Keyword Diabetes-specific quality of life
Audit of diabetes-dependent quality of life (ADDQoL)
Type 2 diabetes
Adults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 08 Nov 2013, 23:11:47 EST by Dr Bryan Mukandi on behalf of School of Public Health