Revisiting followership through a social identity perspective: the role of collective follower emotion and action

Tee, Eugene Y. J., Paulsen, Neil and Ashkanasy, Neal (2013) Revisiting followership through a social identity perspective: the role of collective follower emotion and action. Leadership Quarterly, 24 6: 902-918. doi:10.1016/j.leaqua.2013.10.002

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Author Tee, Eugene Y. J.
Paulsen, Neil
Ashkanasy, Neal
Title Revisiting followership through a social identity perspective: the role of collective follower emotion and action
Journal name Leadership Quarterly   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1048-9843
1873-3409
Publication date 2013-12-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.leaqua.2013.10.002
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 6
Start page 902
End page 918
Total pages 17
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Abstract We review the concept of followership, with a specific focus on how followers actively influence leadership outcomes. We examine in particular research from four key areas: social identity perspectives on leadership, intergroup emotion theory, collective action, and reciprocal affect within leader-follower interactions. Our central proposition is that followers engage in actions, driven by both cognitive and affective-based processes, which affect leadership outcomes. Moreover, because leaders are part of the groups they lead and therefore embedded within the social context of a group, we propose that any action that affirms or threatens the salient group will trigger both cognitive and emotional responses from followers towards leaders. These include the extent to which a leader engages in actions that are perceived as (1) self-sacrificial, (2) procedurally fair, and (3) expressing emotions congruent with that of their group. We also propose that the extent to which followers translate their perceptions and emotions towards collective action towards their leaders will be moderated by individual-level group identification and group-level shared identity. To conclude, we highlight theoretical implications in light of these propositions and suggest areas for further research on followership. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
We review the concept of followership, with a specific focus on how followers actively influence leadership outcomes. We examine in particular research from four key areas: social identity perspectives on leadership, intergroup emotion theory, collective action, and reciprocal affect within leader–follower interactions. Our central proposition is that followers engage in actions, driven by both cognitive and affective-based processes, which affect leadership outcomes. Moreover, because leaders are part of the groups they lead and therefore embedded within the social context of a group, we propose that any action that affirms or threatens the salient group will trigger both cognitive and emotional responses from followers towards leaders. These include the extent to which a leader engages in actions that are perceived as (1) self-sacrificial, (2) procedurally fair, and (3) expressing emotions congruent with that of their group. We also propose that the extent to which followers translate their perceptions and emotions towards collective action towards their leaders will be moderated by individual-level group identification and group-level shared identity. To conclude, we highlight theoretical implications in light of these propositions and suggest areas for further research on followership.
Keyword Followership
Identity
Emotions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 10 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 04 Nov 2013, 20:46:40 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School