Intense language training for aphasia. Contribution of cognitive factors

Breitenstein, C., Kramer, K., Meinzer, M., Baumgaertner, A., Floeel, A. and Knecht, S. (2009) Intense language training for aphasia. Contribution of cognitive factors. Nervenarzt, 80 2: 149-154. doi:10.1007/s00115-008-2571-6


Author Breitenstein, C.
Kramer, K.
Meinzer, M.
Baumgaertner, A.
Floeel, A.
Knecht, S.
Title Intense language training for aphasia. Contribution of cognitive factors
Journal name Nervenarzt   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0028-2804
1433-0407
Publication date 2009-02-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1007/s00115-008-2571-6
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 80
Issue 2
Start page 149
End page 154
Total pages 5
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language ger
Formatted abstract
 The best predictor of successful language therapy after stroke is a high intensity of treatment (with 5–10 h training per week). However, the necessity of several hours of language exercises each day draws considerably on attentional and cognitive resources of the patients. Thus, not all aphasic patients may be equally suited for intense training approaches. In the present review non-verbal cognitive deficits that often accompany a stroke-induced aphasia are described. Furthermore, initial empirical data on cognitive functions, which predict the success of therapy (intense) after stroke, are summarized. Patients in the acute stage benefit most from intense aphasia treatment, when long-term memory consolidation is relatively preserved. For the chronic stage, indirect evidence suggests that premorbid intelligence as well as attentional functions have positive effects on the success of intense therapy. An empirically based allocation of patients to intense aphasia treatment awaits the results of multicenter trials with sufficiently large sample sizes.
Keyword Aphasia
Stroke
Intense language training
Spontaneous recovery
Cognition
Executive Function
Anomia Treatment
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
 
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