Development of a novel Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity

Keymer, Philip C., Pratt, Steven and Lant, Paul A. (2013) Development of a novel Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity. Biotechnology and Bioengineering, 110 9: 2405-2411. doi:10.1002/bit.24905


Author Keymer, Philip C.
Pratt, Steven
Lant, Paul A.
Title Development of a novel Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) to examine dissolved oxygen inhibition on algal activity
Journal name Biotechnology and Bioengineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3592
1097-0290
Publication date 2013-09-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/bit.24905
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 110
Issue 9
Start page 2405
End page 2411
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Abstract The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30mgO2L-1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22 +/- 0.07 L mg(-1) and common log(10)CI50 of 27.2 +/- 0.7 mg L-1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110:2405-2411. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Formatted abstract
The development of an Electrochemical System for Oxygen Control (ESOC) for examining algal photosynthetic activity as a function of dissolved oxygen (DO) is outlined. The main innovation of the tool is coulombic titration in order to balance the electrochemical reduction of oxygen with the oxygen input to achieve a steady DO set-point. ESOC allows quantification of algal oxygen production whilst simultaneously maintaining a desired DO concentration. The tool was validated abiotically by comparison with a mass transfer approach for quantifying oxygenation. It was then applied to quantify oxygen inhibition of algal activity. Five experiments, using an enriched culture of Scenedesmus sp. as the inoculum, are presented. For each experiment, ESOC was used to quantify algal activity at a series of DO set-points. In all experiments substantial oxygen inhibition was observed at DO >30 mgO₂ L−1. Inhibition was shown to fit a Hill inhibition model, with a common Hill coefficient of 0.22 ± 0.07 mg L−1 and common log10 CI50 of 27.2 ± 0.7 mg L−1. This is the first time that the oxygen inhibition kinetic parameters have been quantified under controlled DO conditions.
Keyword Microalgae
Oxygen inhibition
Dissolved oxygen
Electrochemical reduction
Photosynthesis
Electrochemical system for oxygen control (ESOC)
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 31 Oct 2013, 20:41:28 EST by Mr Philip Keymer on behalf of School of Chemical Engineering