Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia

Krosch, M. N., Baker, A. M., Mather, P. B. and Cranston, P. S. (2011) Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia. Freshwater Biology, 56 7: 1328-1341. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2427.2010.02571.x


Author Krosch, M. N.
Baker, A. M.
Mather, P. B.
Cranston, P. S.
Title Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia
Formatted title
Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia
Journal name Freshwater Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0046-5070
1365-2427
Publication date 2011-07-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2010.02571.x
Volume 56
Issue 7
Start page 1328
End page 1341
Total pages 14
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Abstract A diverse array of patterns has been reported regarding the spatial extent of population genetic structure and effective dispersal in freshwater macroinvertebrates. In river systems, the movements of many taxa can be restricted to varying degrees by the natural stream channel hierarchy. In this study, we sampled populations of the non-biting freshwater midge Echinocladius martini in the Paluma bioregion of tropical northeast Queensland to investigate fine scale patterns of within- and among-stream dispersal and gene flow within a purported historical refuge. We amplified a 639-bp fragment of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I and analysed genetic structure using pairwise Φ ST, hierarchical amova, Mantel tests and a parsimony network. Genetic variation was partitioned among stream sections, using Streamtree, to investigate the effect of potential instream dispersal barriers. The data revealed strong natal site fidelity and significant differentiation among neighbouring, geographically proximate streams. We found evidence for only episodic adult flight among sites on separate stream reaches. Overall, however, our data suggested that both larval and adult dispersal was largely limited to within a stream channel. This may arise from a combination of the high density of riparian vegetation physically restricting dispersal and from the joint effects of habitat stability and large population sizes. Together these latter may make it more likely that upstream populations will persist, even in the absence of regular compensatory upstream flight, and will thus reduce the adaptive value of dispersal among streams. Taken together, these data suggest that dispersal of E. martini is highly restricted, to the scale of only a few kilometres, and hence occurs predominantly within the natal stream.
Keyword Dispersal
Downstream drift
Freshwater
Lotic
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry
 
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Created: Sat, 26 Oct 2013, 01:44:11 EST by Matthew Krosch on behalf of Centre for Water in the Minerals Industry