Review of techniques to manufacture micro-hydrogel particles for the food industry and their applications

Shewan, Heather M. and Stokes, Jason R. (2013) Review of techniques to manufacture micro-hydrogel particles for the food industry and their applications. Journal of Food Engineering, 119 4: 781-792. doi:10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2013.06.046


Author Shewan, Heather M.
Stokes, Jason R.
Title Review of techniques to manufacture micro-hydrogel particles for the food industry and their applications
Journal name Journal of Food Engineering   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0260-8774
1873-5770
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.jfoodeng.2013.06.046
Volume 119
Issue 4
Start page 781
End page 792
Total pages 12
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Microgels are 'soft' microscopic cross-linked polymeric particles that are being increasingly exploited in a variety of industries for rheology control, encapsulation and targeted delivery. They are valued because of the ability to tune their functionality to address specific applications in oil recovery, coatings, drug delivery, cosmetics, personal care and foods. Food microgels are typically biopolymer hydrogels in the form of microspheres, nanospheres (also called nanogels), spheroids and fibres. The utilisation of engineered microgels in foods has so far been limited, despite their great potential to address several needs in the food industry, including: satiety control, encapsulation of phytonutrients and prebiotics, texture control for healthier food formulations (e.g. reduced fat products), and targeting delivery to specific areas in the digestive tract. We review the scientific and patent literature on the utilisation and manufacturing methods for producing microgels with an emphasis on micro-hydrogels for food applications.
Keyword Microgel
Nanogel
Core shell
Microparticle
Nanoparticle
Biopolymer
Protein
Polysaccharide
Emulsion
Atomisation
Microfluidics
Phase separation
Crosslink
Rheology
Encapsulation
Satiety
Targeted delivery
Controlled delivery
Spheroids
Fibre
Monodispersed Polymer Microspheres
Gelatin Microspheres
Delivery systems
In Vivo
Droplet formation
Fat replacers
Gel particles
Fluid gels
Rheology
Suspensions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 9 July 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 92 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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