Thermal Buffering of Microhabitats is a Critical Factor Mediating Warming Vulnerability of Frogs in the Philippine Biodiversity Hotspot

Scheffers, Brett R., Brunner, Rebecca M., Ramirez, Sara D., Shoo, Luke P., Diesmos, Arvin and Williams, Stephen E. (2013) Thermal Buffering of Microhabitats is a Critical Factor Mediating Warming Vulnerability of Frogs in the Philippine Biodiversity Hotspot. Biotropica, 45 5: 628-635. doi:10.1111/btp.12042


Author Scheffers, Brett R.
Brunner, Rebecca M.
Ramirez, Sara D.
Shoo, Luke P.
Diesmos, Arvin
Williams, Stephen E.
Title Thermal Buffering of Microhabitats is a Critical Factor Mediating Warming Vulnerability of Frogs in the Philippine Biodiversity Hotspot
Journal name Biotropica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3606
1744-7429
Publication date 2013-09-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/btp.12042
Volume 45
Issue 5
Start page 628
End page 635
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Species may circumvent the impacts of climate warming if the habitats they use reduce ambient temperature. In this study, we identified which frog species from a tropical montane rain forest in the Philippines may be vulnerable to climate warming. To do so, we selected five anuran species that utilize four breeding habitats and identified the sensitivity and exposure of tadpoles and direct-developer eggs to heat by measuring their critical thermal maximums (CTmax) and the habitat-specific temperatures they experience. Our study species included two direct-developer frogs—one species that lays its eggs on exposed leaves, and another that lays its eggs in ferns—and three species that produce aquatic free-swimming tadpoles—two stream breeders, and one phytotelm (tree hole) breeder. We compared thermal tolerances derived from microclimates of breeding habitats with tolerances derived from macroclimate (i.e., non-buffered air temperature taken from the rain forest canopy). We also examined whether differences in CTmax existed across life-history stages (egg, metamorph/young-of-year, and adult) for the two direct-developer frog species. Habitats buffered ambient temperature and expanded thermal tolerances of all frog species. We found that direct-developers, however, are more vulnerable to increased temperatures than aquatic breeders—indicated by their high sensitivity to temperature, and exposure to high temperatures. Direct-developer eggs were more sensitive to warming than both metamorph and adult life-history stages. Thermally buffered microhabitats may represent the only protection against current and impending climate warming. Our data highlight the importance of considering sensitivity and exposure in unison when deciphering warming vulnerability of frogs.
Keyword Amphibian
Climate change
Critical thermal maximum
Global change
Thermal Tolerance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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