Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus

Gagnon, Yakir L., Shashar, Nadav and Kroger, Ronald H. H. (2011) Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214 16: 2724-2729. doi:10.1242/jeb.048066

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Author Gagnon, Yakir L.
Shashar, Nadav
Kroger, Ronald H. H.
Title Adaptation in the optical properties of the crystalline lens in the eyes of the Lessepsian migrant Siganus rivulatus
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0949
1477-9145
Publication date 2011-08-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1242/jeb.048066
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 214
Issue 16
Start page 2724
End page 2729
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher The Company of Biologists Ltd.
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Vision is an important source of information for many animals. The crystalline lens plays a central role in the visual pathway and hence the ecology of fishes. In this study, we tested whether the different light regimes in the Mediterranean and Red Seas have an effect on the optical properties of the lenses in the rivulated rabbitfish, Siganus rivulatus. This species has migrated through the Suez Canal from the Red Sea and established a vital population in the Mediterranean Sea. Longitudinal spherical aberration curves and focal lengths of the fish lenses were measured by laser scans and compared between the two populations. In addition, rivulated rabbitfish from the Mediterranean Sea were exposed to colored light (yellow, green and blue) and unfiltered light for periods of 1 or 13 days to test for short-term adjustments. Lens focal length was significantly longer (3%) in the Rea Sea population. The shorter focal length of the Mediterranean population can be explained as an adaptation to the dimmer light environment, as this difference makes the Mediterranean eyes 5% more sensitive than the eyes of the Red Sea population. The difference may be due to genetic differences or, more likely, adaptive developmental plasticity. Short-term regulatory mechanisms do not seem to be involved. 
Keyword Lessepsian migration
Adaptation
Fish
Lens
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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