Multilocus population genetic analysis of the Southwest Pacific malaria vector Anopheles punctulatus

Seah, Ignatius M., Ambrose, Luke, Cooper, Robert D. and Beebe, Nigel W. (2013) Multilocus population genetic analysis of the Southwest Pacific malaria vector Anopheles punctulatus. International Journal for Parasitology, 43 10: 825-835. doi:10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.05.004


Author Seah, Ignatius M.
Ambrose, Luke
Cooper, Robert D.
Beebe, Nigel W.
Title Multilocus population genetic analysis of the Southwest Pacific malaria vector Anopheles punctulatus
Formatted title
Multilocus population genetic analysis of the Southwest Pacific malaria vector Anopheles punctulatus
Journal name International Journal for Parasitology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-7519
1879-0135
Publication date 2013-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpara.2013.05.004
Volume 43
Issue 10
Start page 825
End page 835
Total pages 11
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The population structure and history of the cryptic malaria vector species, Anopheles punctulatus (Doenitz), was investigated throughout Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands with the aim of detailing genetic subdivisions and the potential for movement through this biogeographically complex region. We obtained larval collections from over 80 sites and utilised a diverse array of molecular markers that evolve through different processes. Individuals were initially identified to species and genotyped using the ribosomal DNA second internal transcribed spacer. DNA sequencing of a single copy nuclear ribosomal protein S9 and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I loci were then investigated and 12 nuclear microsatellite markers were developed and analysed. Our data revealed three genetically distinct populations - one in Papua New Guinea, the second on Buka Island (Bougainville Province, Papua New Guinea), and the third on Guadalcanal Island (Solomon Islands). Genetic differentiation within Papua New Guinea was much lower than that found in studies of other closely related species in the region. The data does suggest that A. punctulatus has undergone a population bottleneck followed by a recent population and range expansion in Papua New Guinea. Humans and regional economic growth may be facilitating this population expansion, as A. punctulatus is able to rapidly occupy human modified landscapes and traverse unsealed roads. We therefore anticipate extensive movement of this species through New Guinea - particularly into the highlands, with a potential increase in malaria frequency in a warming climate - as well as relatively unrestricted gene flow of advantageous alleles that may confound vector control efforts.
Keyword Anopheles
Malaria
Population genetics
Phylogeography
Microsatellites
New Guinea
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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