Is co-prescribing a multi-strain probiotic the solution for treating and preventing proton pump inhibitor (PPIs) induced Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) while maintaining evidence based pharmacotherapy?

Bella, Catherine J., Coulson, Samantha and Vitetta, Luis (2014) Is co-prescribing a multi-strain probiotic the solution for treating and preventing proton pump inhibitor (PPIs) induced Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) while maintaining evidence based pharmacotherapy?. Advances in Integrative Medicine, 1 1: 52-54. doi:10.1016/j.aimed.2013.08.006

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Author Bella, Catherine J.
Coulson, Samantha
Vitetta, Luis
Title Is co-prescribing a multi-strain probiotic the solution for treating and preventing proton pump inhibitor (PPIs) induced Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) while maintaining evidence based pharmacotherapy?
Formatted title
Is co-prescribing a multi-strain probiotic the solution for treating and preventing proton pump inhibitor (PPIs) induced Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) while maintaining evidence based pharmacotherapy?
Journal name Advances in Integrative Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2212-9626
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aimed.2013.08.006
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 52
End page 54
Total pages 3
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A recent study investigating faecal transplants to eliminate Clostridium difficile infections has elicited further interest regarding the pharmacobiotic potential of the human gastrointestinal microbiome. Probiotic preparations may exhibit significant potential for the treatment of CDAD. Probiotics are defined as living organisms in food and dietary supplements that, upon ingestion, can improve the health of the host beyond their inherent basic nutritional content. The human–microbial gastrointestinal tract (GIT) interface is an ecosystem that participates in a variety of important roles in human health and disease. Maintaining this ecosystem in a balanced state is a critical requisite for the control of pathogenic bacteria and the associated toxin load produced in the small and large bowel. Pharmacotherapy induced adverse metabolic conditions that ensue can disrupt the GIT homeostasis and contribute toward a dysbiotic burden that increases the risk of CDAD.
Keyword Clostridium difficile
Infections
Probiotics
Proton pump inhibitors
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 18 September 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Sep 2013, 16:37:48 EST by Dr Luis Vitetta on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital