The gastrointestinal microbiota and multi-strain probiotic therapy: In children and adolescent obesity

Palacios, Talia, Coulson, Samantha, Butt, Henry and Vitetta, Luis (2014) The gastrointestinal microbiota and multi-strain probiotic therapy: In children and adolescent obesity. Advances in Integrative Medicine, 1 1: 2-8. doi:10.1016/j.aimed.2013.08.010

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Author Palacios, Talia
Coulson, Samantha
Butt, Henry
Vitetta, Luis
Title The gastrointestinal microbiota and multi-strain probiotic therapy: In children and adolescent obesity
Journal name Advances in Integrative Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2212-9626
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.aimed.2013.08.010
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 2
End page 8
Total pages 7
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Childhood obesity is a predisposing factor for chronic diseases both in the adolescent years and into adulthood. Current research efforts have focused on host and environmental factors that may affect energy balance. This has lead to a plausible, biological postulation that an obese microbiota profile may exist and may demonstrate increased energy yielding behaviour by such bacteria. Consequently, the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota is gaining significant research interest in relation to obesity in an attempt to better understand the aetiology of obesity and potentially new methods of treatment. It is now well known that the microbiota that colonise the GIT perform a number of functions that include regulating the normal development and function of the mucosal barriers; assisting with maturation of immunological tissues, which in turn promotes immunological tolerance to antigens from foods, the environment, or potentially pathogenic organisms; chemical communication and influence of target tissues such as the liver, brain, muscle, adipose tissue, heart and GIT; preventing propagation of pathogenic microorganisms as well as controlling nutrient uptake and metabolism. Here we develop a hypothesis that multi-strain probiotics may provide a potential therapeutic role when supplemented conjointly with lifestyle interventions for obese children/adolescents. The administration of multi–strain probiotics in conjunction with lifestyle measures may rescue the GIT obese microbiome phenotype and encourage the re-establishment of a microbiome towards one that resembles that of lean individuals.
Keyword NAFLD
NASH
Steatosis
Probiotics
Obesity
Gastrointestinal Tract
Adolescents
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Corrected Proof. In Press. Available online 18 September 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 24 Sep 2013, 16:33:57 EST by Dr Luis Vitetta on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital