Clinical outcomes of vitamin D deficiency and supplementation in cancer patients

Teleni, Laisa, Baker, Jacqueline, Koczwara, Bogda, Kimlin, Michael G., Walpole, Euan, Tsai, Kathy and Isenring, Elizabeth A. (2013) Clinical outcomes of vitamin D deficiency and supplementation in cancer patients. Nutrition Reviews, 71 9: 611-621. doi:10.1111/nure.12047


Author Teleni, Laisa
Baker, Jacqueline
Koczwara, Bogda
Kimlin, Michael G.
Walpole, Euan
Tsai, Kathy
Isenring, Elizabeth A.
Title Clinical outcomes of vitamin D deficiency and supplementation in cancer patients
Journal name Nutrition Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0029-6643
1753-4887
Publication date 2013-09-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/nure.12047
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 71
Issue 9
Start page 611
End page 621
Total pages 11
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher International Life Sciences Institute
Language eng
Abstract Results of recent studies suggest that circulating levels of vitamin D may play an important role in cancer-specific outcomes. The present systematic review was undertaken to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<25nmol/L) and insufficiency (25-50nmol/L) in cancer patients and to evaluate the association between circulating calcidiol (the indicator of vitamin D status) and clinical outcomes. A systematic search of original, peer-reviewed studies on calcidiol at cancer diagnosis, and throughout treatment and survival, was conducted yielding 4,706 studies. A total of 37 studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Reported mean blood calcidiol levels ranged from 24.7 to 87.4nmol/L, with up to 31% of patients identified as deficient and 67% as insufficient. The efficacy of cholecalciferol supplementation for raising the concentration of circulating calcidiol is unclear; standard supplement regimens of <1,000IU D-3/day may not be sufficient to maintain adequate concentrations or prevent decreasing calcidiol. Dose-response studies linking vitamin D status to musculoskeletal and survival outcomes in cancer patients are lacking.
Formatted abstract
Results of recent studies suggest that circulating levels of vitamin D may play an important role in cancer-specific outcomes. The present systematic review was undertaken to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency (<25nmol/L) and insufficiency (25-50nmol/L) in cancer patients and to evaluate the association between circulating calcidiol (the indicator of vitamin D status) and clinical outcomes. A systematic search of original, peer-reviewed studies on calcidiol at cancer diagnosis, and throughout treatment and survival, was conducted yielding 4,706 studies. A total of 37 studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. Reported mean blood calcidiol levels ranged from 24.7 to 87.4nmol/L, with up to 31% of patients identified as deficient and 67% as insufficient. The efficacy of cholecalciferol supplementation for raising the concentration of circulating calcidiol is unclear; standard supplement regimens of <1,000IU D3/day may not be sufficient to maintain adequate concentrations or prevent decreasing calcidiol. Dose-response studies linking vitamin D status to musculoskeletal and survival outcomes in cancer patients are lacking.
Keyword Cancer
Cancer specific outcomes
Cholecalciferol
Vitamin D deficiency
Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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