Is low birth weight an antecedent of CKD in later life? : a systematic review of observational studies

White, Sarah L., Perkovic, Vlado, Cass, Alan, Chang, Choon Lan, Poulter, Neil R., Spector, Tim, Haysom, Leigh, Craig, Jonathan C., Al Salmi, Isa, Chadban, Steven J. and Huxley, Rachel R. (2009) Is low birth weight an antecedent of CKD in later life? : a systematic review of observational studies. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 54 2: 248-261. doi:10.1053/j.ajkd.2008.12.042


Author White, Sarah L.
Perkovic, Vlado
Cass, Alan
Chang, Choon Lan
Poulter, Neil R.
Spector, Tim
Haysom, Leigh
Craig, Jonathan C.
Al Salmi, Isa
Chadban, Steven J.
Huxley, Rachel R.
Title Is low birth weight an antecedent of CKD in later life? : a systematic review of observational studies
Journal name American Journal of Kidney Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0272-6386
1523-6838
Publication date 2009-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1053/j.ajkd.2008.12.042
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 54
Issue 2
Start page 248
End page 261
Total pages 14
Place of publication Maryland Heights MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Language eng
Subject 2727 Nephrology
Abstract Background: There has been considerable interest in the hypothesis that low birth weight may be a marker of impaired nephrogenesis and that this is causally related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Setting & Population: Studies of the relationship between birth weight and CKD published before February 1, 2008, were identified by using electronic searches. Selection Criteria: All studies that had collected data for birth weight and kidney function at greater than 12 months of age were eligible for inclusion, except for studies of extremely low-birth-weight infants, very premature infants, or toxic exposure in utero. Study Factor: Birth weight. Outcomes: CKD defined as albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate (<60 mL/min/1.73 m or < 10th centile for age/sex), or end-stage renal disease. Results: We analyzed 31 relevant cohort or case-control studies with data for 49,376 individuals and data for 2,183,317 individuals from a single record-linkage study. Overall, 16 studies reported a significant association between low birth weight and risk of CKD and 16 observed a null result. The combination of weighted estimates from the 18 studies for which risk estimates were available (n = 46,249 plus 2,183,317 from the record linkage study) gave an overall odds ratio (OR) of 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44 to 2.08). Combined ORs were consistent in magnitude and direction for risks of albuminuria (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.19 to 2.77), end-stage renal disease (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.88), or low estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.31 to 2.45). Limitations: A reliance on published estimates and estimates provided on request rather than individual patient data and the possibility of reporting bias. Conclusions: Existing data indicate that low birth weight is associated with subsequent risk of CKD, although there is scope for additional well-designed population-based studies with accurate assessment of birth weight and kidney function and consideration of important confounders, including maternal and socioeconomic factors.
Formatted abstract
Background: There has been considerable interest in the hypothesis that low birth weight may be a marker of impaired nephrogenesis and that this is causally related to chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Setting & Population: Studies of the relationship between birth weight and CKD published before February 1, 2008, were identified by using electronic searches. Selection Criteria: All studies that had collected data for birth weight and kidney function at greater than 12 months of age were eligible for inclusion, except for studies of extremely low-birth-weight infants, very premature infants, or toxic exposure in utero. Study Factor: Birth weight. Outcomes: CKD defined as albuminuria, low estimated glomerular filtration rate (<60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or < 10th centile for age/sex), or end-stage renal disease. Results: We analyzed 31 relevant cohort or case-control studies with data for 49,376 individuals and data for 2,183,317 individuals from a single record-linkage study. Overall, 16 studies reported a significant association between low birth weight and risk of CKD and 16 observed a null result. The combination of weighted estimates from the 18 studies for which risk estimates were available (n = 46,249 plus 2,183,317 from the record linkage study) gave an overall odds ratio (OR) of 1.73 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44 to 2.08). Combined ORs were consistent in magnitude and direction for risks of albuminuria (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.19 to 2.77), end-stage renal disease (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.33 to 1.88), or low estimated glomerular filtration rate (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.31 to 2.45). Limitations: A reliance on published estimates and estimates provided on request rather than individual patient data and the possibility of reporting bias. Conclusions: Existing data indicate that low birth weight is associated with subsequent risk of CKD, although there is scope for additional well-designed population-based studies with accurate assessment of birth weight and kidney function and consideration of important confounders, including maternal and socioeconomic factors.
Keyword Chronic kidney disease
Low birth weight
Systematic reviews
Meta analysis
End stage renal disease
Albuminuria
Glomerular filtration rate
Chronic kidney disease
Intrauterine growth retardation
Fetal Origins Hypothesis
Southeastern United-States
Glomerular filtration rate
Chronic renal failure
Blood pressure
Risk factors
Adult life
Socioeconomic disadvantage
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
School of Public Health Publications
 
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