Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women: meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies

Huxley, Rachel, Barzi, Federica and Woodward, Mark (2006) Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women: meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies. BMJ, 332 7533: 73-76. doi:10.1136/bmj.38678.389583.7C


Author Huxley, Rachel
Barzi, Federica
Woodward, Mark
Title Excess risk of fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women: meta-analysis of 37 prospective cohort studies
Journal name BMJ
ISSN 0959-8146
1756-1833
Publication date 2006-01-01
Year available 2006
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/bmj.38678.389583.7C
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 332
Issue 7533
Start page 73
End page 76
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher B M J Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To estimate the relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes in men and women.

Design: Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

Data sources
Studies published between 1966 and March 2005, identified through Embase and Medline, using a combined text word and MESH heading search strategy, in addition to studies from the Asia Pacific Cohort Studies Collaboration.

Review methods: Studies were eligible if they had reported estimates of the relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease comparing men and women with and without diabetes. Studies were excluded if the estimates were not adjusted at least for age.

Results: 37 studies of type 2 diabetes and fatal coronary heart disease among a total of 447 064 patients were identified. The rate of fatal coronary heart disease was higher in patients with diabetes than in those without (5.4 v 1.6%). The overall summary relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with no diabetes was significantly greater among women than it was among men: 3.50, 95% confidence interval 2.70 to 4.53 v 2.06, 1.81 to 2.34. After exclusion of the eight studies that had adjusted only for age, the difference in risk between the sexes was substantially reduced but still highly significant. The pooled ratio of the relative risks (women:men) from the 29 studies with multiple adjusted estimates was 1.46 (1.14 to 1.88).

Conclusions: The relative risk for fatal coronary heart disease associated with diabetes is 50% higher in women than it is in men. This greater excess coronary risk may be explained by more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles among women with diabetes, combined with possible disparities in treatment that favour men.
Keyword Sex Differences
Cardiovascular disease (CVD)
Aspirin Use
Follow up
Mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 691 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 802 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 14 Sep 2013, 04:52:40 EST by System User on behalf of School of Public Health