Dry-Coated Live Viral Vector Vaccines Delivered by Nanopatch Microprojections Retain Long-Term Thermostability and Induce Transgene-Specific T Cell Responses in Mice

Pearson, Frances E., McNeilly, Celia L., Crichton, Michael L., Primiero, Clare A., Yukiko, Sally R., Fernando, Germain J. P., Chen, Xianfeng, Gilbert, Sarah C., Hill, Adrian V. S. and Kendall, Mark A. F. (2013) Dry-Coated Live Viral Vector Vaccines Delivered by Nanopatch Microprojections Retain Long-Term Thermostability and Induce Transgene-Specific T Cell Responses in Mice. PLoS ONE, 8 7: e67888.1-e67888.9. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0067888


Author Pearson, Frances E.
McNeilly, Celia L.
Crichton, Michael L.
Primiero, Clare A.
Yukiko, Sally R.
Fernando, Germain J. P.
Chen, Xianfeng
Gilbert, Sarah C.
Hill, Adrian V. S.
Kendall, Mark A. F.
Title Dry-Coated Live Viral Vector Vaccines Delivered by Nanopatch Microprojections Retain Long-Term Thermostability and Induce Transgene-Specific T Cell Responses in Mice
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-07-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0067888
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 7
Start page e67888.1
End page e67888.9
Total pages 10
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The disadvantages of needle-based immunisation motivate the development of simple, low cost, needle-free alternatives. Vaccine delivery to cutaneous environments rich in specialised antigen-presenting cells using microprojection patches has practical and immunological advantages over conventional needle delivery. Additionally, stable coating of vaccine onto microprojections removes logistical obstacles presented by the strict requirement for cold-chain storage and distribution of liquid vaccine, or lyophilised vaccine plus diluent. These attributes make these technologies particularly suitable for delivery of vaccines against diseases such as malaria, which exerts its worst effects in countries with poorly-resourced healthcare systems. Live viral vectors including adenoviruses and poxviruses encoding exogenous antigens have shown significant clinical promise as vaccines, due to their ability to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells. Here, the simian adenovirus serotype 63 and the poxvirus modified vaccinia Ankara - two vectors under evaluation for the delivery of malaria antigens to humans - were formulated for coating onto Nanopatch microprojections and applied to murine skin. Co-formulation with the stabilising disaccharides trehalose and sucrose protected virions during the dry-coating process. Transgene-specific CD8+ T cell responses following Nanopatch delivery of both vectors were similar to intradermal injection controls after a single immunisation (despite a much lower delivered dose), though MVA boosting of pre-primed responses with Nanopatch was found to be less effective than the ID route. Importantly, disaccharide-stabilised ChAd63 could be stored for 10 weeks at 37°C with less than 1 log10 loss of viability, and retained single-dose immunogenicity after storage. These data support the further development of microprojection patches for the deployment of live vaccines in hot climates.
Keyword Prime Boost Immunization
Protective Efficacy
Langerhans Cells
Dendritic Cells
Array Patches
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Sun, 08 Sep 2013, 10:16:26 EST by System User on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology