Networks of knowledge or just old wives' tales?: a diary-based analysis of women's self-care practices and everyday lay expertise

Broom, Alex, Meurk, Carla, Adams, Jon and Sibbritt, David (2013) Networks of knowledge or just old wives' tales?: a diary-based analysis of women's self-care practices and everyday lay expertise. Health, OnlineFirst 1-17. doi:10.1177/1363459313497610

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Author Broom, Alex
Meurk, Carla
Adams, Jon
Sibbritt, David
Title Networks of knowledge or just old wives' tales?: a diary-based analysis of women's self-care practices and everyday lay expertise
Journal name Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1363-4593
1461-7196
Publication date 2013-08-28
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1363459313497610
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume OnlineFirst
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Complementary and alternative medicine is increasingly popular in Australia and particularly among women. While existing research provides some understanding of women’s engagement with complementary and alternative medicine and biomedicine, there has been comparatively little examination of the day-to-day character of their experiences. In this study, we utilise solicited diaries with women aged 60–65 years drawn from the 1946–1951 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health to capture the temporal dimension of their therapeutic engagement. Focusing on 30 active complementary and alternative medicine users, we explore women’s experiences of managing their health, illness and well-being over a 1-month period. The themes that emerge from their diaries illustrate the day-to-day enactment of lay expertise through informal knowledge networks, practices of self-trialling and experimentation and the moralities underpinning self-care. The diaries provide unprecedented temporal insight into the (often problematic) enactment of lay expertise at the nexus of complementary and alternative medicine and biomedicine. They also point to the value of longitudinal techniques of data collection for augmenting more traditional sociological ways of exploring therapeutic pluralism.
Keyword Complementary and alternative medicine
Illness narratives
Gender and health
Solicited diaries
Longitudinal qualitative methods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online before print August 28, 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 04 Sep 2013, 20:59:17 EST by Mary Anne Patton on behalf of School of Social Science