Disentangling the role of environmental and human pressures on biological invasions across Europe

Pysek, Petr, Jarosik, Vojtech, Hulme, Philip E., Kuehn, Ingolf, Wild, Jan, Arianoutsou, Margarita, Bacher, Sven, Chiron, Francois, Didziulis, Viktoras, Essl, Franz, Genovesi, Piero, Gherardi, Francesca, Hejda, Martin, Kark, Salit, Lambdon, Philip W., Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure, Nentwig, Wolfgang, Pergl, Jan, Poboljsaj, Katja, Rabitsch, Wolfgang, Roques, Alain, Roy, David B., Shirley, Susan, Solarz, Wojciech, Vila, Montserrat and Winter, Marten (2010) Disentangling the role of environmental and human pressures on biological invasions across Europe. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107 27: 12157-12162. doi:10.1073/pnas.1002314107


Author Pysek, Petr
Jarosik, Vojtech
Hulme, Philip E.
Kuehn, Ingolf
Wild, Jan
Arianoutsou, Margarita
Bacher, Sven
Chiron, Francois
Didziulis, Viktoras
Essl, Franz
Genovesi, Piero
Gherardi, Francesca
Hejda, Martin
Kark, Salit
Lambdon, Philip W.
Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure
Nentwig, Wolfgang
Pergl, Jan
Poboljsaj, Katja
Rabitsch, Wolfgang
Roques, Alain
Roy, David B.
Shirley, Susan
Solarz, Wojciech
Vila, Montserrat
Winter, Marten
Title Disentangling the role of environmental and human pressures on biological invasions across Europe
Journal name Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0027-8424
1091-6490
Publication date 2010-07-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1002314107
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 107
Issue 27
Start page 12157
End page 12162
Total pages 6
Place of publication Washington, DC United States
Publisher National Academy of Sciences
Language eng
Abstract The accelerating rates of international trade, travel, and transport in the latter half of the twentieth century have led to the progressive mixing of biota from across the world and the number of species introduced to new regions continues to increase. The importance of biogeographic, climatic, economic, and demographic factors as drivers of this trend is increasingly being realized but as yet there is no consensus regarding their relative importance. Whereas little may be done to mitigate the effects of geography and climate on invasions, a wider range of options may exist to moderate the impacts of economic and demographic drivers. Here we use the most recent data available from Europe to partition between macroecological, economic, and demographic variables the variation in alien species richness of bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, terrestrial insects, aquatic invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Only national wealth and human population density were statistically significant predictors in the majority of models when analyzed jointly with climate, geography, and land cover. The economic and demographic variables reflect the intensity of human activities and integrate the effect of factors that directly determine the outcome of invasion such as propagule pressure, pathways of introduction, eutrophication, and the intensity of anthropogenic disturbance. The strong influence of economic and demographic variables on the levels of invasion by alien species demonstrates that future solutions to the problem of biological invasions at a national scale lie in mitigating the negative environmental consequences of human activities that generate wealth and by promoting more sustainable population growth.
Formatted abstract
 The accelerating rates of international trade, travel, and transport in the latter half of the twentieth century have led to the progressive mixing of biota from across the world and the number of species introduced to new regions continues to increase. The importance of biogeographic, climatic, economic, and demographic factors as drivers of this trend is increasingly being realized but as yet there is no consensus regarding their relative importance. Whereas little may be done to mitigate the effects of geography and climate on invasions, a wider range of options may exist to moderate the impacts of economic and demographic drivers. Here we use the most recent data available from Europe to partition between macroecological, economic, and demographic variables the variation in alien species richness of bryophytes, fungi, vascular plants, terrestrial insects, aquatic invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Only national wealth and human population density were statistically significant predictors in the majority of models when analyzed jointly with climate, geography, and land cover. The economic and demographic variables reflect the intensity of human activities and integrate the effect of factors that directly determine the outcome of invasion such as propagule pressure, pathways of introduction, eutrophication, and the intensity of anthropogenic disturbance. The strong influence of economic and demographic variables on the levels of invasion by alien species demonstrates that future solutions to the problem of biological invasions at a national scale lie in mitigating the negative environmental consequences of human activities that generate wealth and by promoting more sustainable population growth.
Keyword Climate
Exotic plants and animals
Geography
Alien Plants
Species Richness
International trade
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID SSPI-CT-2003-511202
CSD2008-00040
AV0Z60050516
MSM0021620828
LC06073
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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