How well do we understand the impacts of alien species on ecosystem services? A pan-European, cross-taxa assessment

Vila, Montserrat, Basnou, Corina, Pysek, Petr, Josefsson, Melanie, Genovesi, Piero, Gollasch, Stephan, Nentwig, Wolfgang, Olenin, Sergej, Roques, Alain, Roy, David, Hulme, Philip E., DAISIE partners and Kark, Salit (2010) How well do we understand the impacts of alien species on ecosystem services? A pan-European, cross-taxa assessment. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8 3: 135-144. doi:10.1890/080083

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Author Vila, Montserrat
Basnou, Corina
Pysek, Petr
Josefsson, Melanie
Genovesi, Piero
Gollasch, Stephan
Nentwig, Wolfgang
Olenin, Sergej
Roques, Alain
Roy, David
Hulme, Philip E.
DAISIE partners
Kark, Salit
Title How well do we understand the impacts of alien species on ecosystem services? A pan-European, cross-taxa assessment
Journal name Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1540-9295
1540-9309
Publication date 2010-04-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1890/080083
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 8
Issue 3
Start page 135
End page 144
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Language eng
Abstract Recent comprehensive data provided through the DAISIE project (www.europe-aliens.org) have facilitated the development of the first pan-European assessment of the impacts of alien plants, vertebrates, and invertebrates – in terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments – on ecosystem services. There are 1094 species with documented ecological impacts and 1347 with economic impacts. The two taxonomic groups with the most species causing impacts are terrestrial invertebrates and terrestrial plants. The North Sea is the maritime region that suffers the most impacts. Across taxa and regions, ecological and economic impacts are highly correlated. Terrestrial invertebrates create greater economic impacts than ecological impacts, while the reverse is true for terrestrial plants. Alien species from all taxonomic groups affect “supporting”, “provisioning”, “regulating”, and “cultural” services and interfere with human well-being. Terrestrial vertebrates are responsible for the greatest range of impacts, and these are widely distributed across Europe. Here, we present a review of the financial costs, as the first step toward calculating an estimate of the economic consequences of alien species in Europe.
Keyword Exotic plant invasions
Biological invasions
Management
Costs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID SSPI-CT2003-511202
GOCE-CT-2003-506675
CGL2007-61165/BOS
CSD2008-00040
AV0Z60050516
0021620828
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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