Most Oxidative Stress Response In Water Samples Comes From Unknown Chemicals: The Need For Effect-Based Water Quality Trigger Values

Escher, Beate I., van Daele, Charlotte, Dutt, Mriga, Tang, Janet Y. M. and Altenburger, Rolf (2013) Most Oxidative Stress Response In Water Samples Comes From Unknown Chemicals: The Need For Effect-Based Water Quality Trigger Values. Environmental Science & Technology, 47 13: 7002-7011. doi:10.1021/es304793h


Author Escher, Beate I.
van Daele, Charlotte
Dutt, Mriga
Tang, Janet Y. M.
Altenburger, Rolf
Title Most Oxidative Stress Response In Water Samples Comes From Unknown Chemicals: The Need For Effect-Based Water Quality Trigger Values
Journal name Environmental Science & Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-936X
1520-5851
Publication date 2013-07-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1021/es304793h
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 47
Issue 13
Start page 7002
End page 7011
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington , D.C., U.S.A.
Publisher American Chemical Society
Language eng
Abstract The induction of adaptive stress response pathways is an early and sensitive indicator of the presence of chemical and non-chemical stressors in cells. An important stress response is the Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway where electrophilic chemicals or chemicals that cause the formation of reactive oxygen species initiate the production of antioxidants and metabolic detoxification enzymes. The AREc32 cell line is sensitive to chemicals inducing oxidative stress and has been previously applied for water quality monitoring of organic micropollutants and disinfection byproducts. Here we propose an algorithm for the derivation of effect-based water quality trigger values for this end point that is based on the combined effects of mixtures of regulated chemicals. Mixture experiments agreed with predictions by the mixture toxicity concept of concentration addition. The responses in the AREc32 and the concentrations of 269 individual chemicals were quantified in nine environmental samples, ranging from treated effluent, recycled water, stormwater to drinking water. The effects of the detected chemicals could explain less than 0.1% of the observed induction of the oxidative stress response in the sample, affirming the need to use effect-based trigger values that account for all chemicals present.
Keyword Risk-assessment
signaling pathways
Line toxicity
Activation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID WRF 10-07
FT100100694
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology Publications
 
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