The Women's Refuge and the crowded house: Aboriginal homelessness hidden in Tennant Creek

Memmott, Paul, Nash, Daphne, Baffour, Bernard and Greenop, Kelly (2013) The Women's Refuge and the crowded house: Aboriginal homelessness hidden in Tennant Creek Brisbane, QLD, Australia: Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Memmott, Paul
Nash, Daphne
Baffour, Bernard
Greenop, Kelly
Title of report The Women's Refuge and the crowded house: Aboriginal homelessness hidden in Tennant Creek
Publication date 2013-08-20
ISBN 1742720869
Publisher Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland
Series ISSR Research Report
Place of publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Total pages 77
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Subjects 220000 Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts - General
370000 Studies in Human Society
379900 Other Studies in Human Society
Abstract/Summary This report presents the findings of a study considering how homelessness is experienced by Aboriginal women in Tennant Creek and the surrounding areas, and profiling the Tennant Creek Women’s Refuge. The Tennant Creek Women’s Refuge is funded by a mix of Commonwealth and State funds, and provides crisis accommodation for up to eight adult women and their children, for up to three months. The agency also provides a domestic violence service, food, information and advocacy, referrals, access to transport, and assistance with removing furniture and personal belongings. The report suggests that the average household size in Tennant Creek may be almost 10 individuals per house, more than three times higher than the Census estimate. This difference is explained by a difference in definition: the report includes transient and mobile individuals in a way that the Census may not. The report highlighted how Aboriginal patterns of mobility do not fit neatly into categories of homelessness. For example, the Women’s Refuge manager suggested that many of her clients may be residing at two, three or four addresses in Tennant Creek simultaneously, with possessions distributed between all locations. Evidence suggests that women in Tennant Creek who sought support were primarily escaping domestic violence. In addition, some were also homeless as a result of overcrowding or poor transport.
Q-Index Code A1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes http://homelessnessclearinghouse.govspace.gov.au/whats-new-3/research-release-the-womens-refuge-and-the-crowded-house-aboriginal-homelessness-hidden-in-tennant-creek-2013-australia/

 
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Created: Sat, 24 Aug 2013, 01:43:14 EST by Ms Shelley Templeman on behalf of School of Architecture