Fossil evidence for seasonal calving and migration of extinct blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus) in southern Africa

Faith, J. Tyler and Thompson, Jessica C. (2013) Fossil evidence for seasonal calving and migration of extinct blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus) in southern Africa. Journal of Biogeography, 40 11: 2108-2118. doi:10.1111/jbi.12154


Author Faith, J. Tyler
Thompson, Jessica C.
Title Fossil evidence for seasonal calving and migration of extinct blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus) in southern Africa
Formatted title
Fossil evidence for seasonal calving and migration of extinct blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus) in southern Africa
Journal name Journal of Biogeography   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-0270
1365-2699
Publication date 2013-06-21
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jbi.12154
Volume 40
Issue 11
Start page 2108
End page 2118
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aim: Palaeoecological data are crucial to understanding the historical extinction of the blue antelope (Hippotragus leucophaeus). This study examined late Quaternary fossil evidence bearing on the blue antelope's calving and migratory habits. Location: Cape Floristic Region (CFR), South Africa.

Methods: Blue antelope mortality patterns were reconstructed from dental remains from fossil assemblages spanning the last c. 200,000 years and located in the CFR's winter and year-round rainfall zones. Two demographic measures were examined: (1) the frequencies of juveniles relative to adults; and (2) the frequencies of neonates relative to older juveniles. Geographical trends were examined across a longitudinal gradient of decreasing winter rainfall and increasing summer rainfall.

Results: There was a significant longitudinal trend in the blue antelope mortality data, with juveniles and neonates declining in frequency from west to east. This suggests that calving occurred primarily in the winter rainfall zone, probably during the winter months when seasonal rains promoted the growth of C3 grasses. The summer drought and lack of adequate forage forced blue antelope to migrate east, in time with summer rainfall and the increased availability of C4 grasses. The migration route probably depended in part on reduced sea levels during glacial phases of the Pleistocene.

Main conclusions: Blue antelope were probably migratory. Rising sea levels at the onset of the Holocene disrupted their migration routes, limited access to west-coast calving grounds, and fragmented populations. Such disruption would have devastated the blue antelope population and contributed to its vulnerability to extinction. Blue antelope survived previous marine transgressions, however, suggesting that other factors played a role in its demise. Agricultural expansion early in the colonial era may have further disrupted migration routes and played an important role in its extinction.
Keyword Blue antelope
Cape Floristic Region
Extinct species
Extinction
Migration
Palaeoecology
Quaternary
Southern Africa
Zooarchaeology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 13 Aug 2013, 07:15:50 EST by Dr Jessica Thompson on behalf of School of Social Science