Are informal carers and community care workers effective in managing malnutrition in the older adult community? A systematic review of current evidence

Marshall, S., Bauer, J., Capra, S. and Isenring, E. (2013) Are informal carers and community care workers effective in managing malnutrition in the older adult community? A systematic review of current evidence. Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, 17 8: 645-651. doi:10.1007/s12603-013-0341-z

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Author Marshall, S.
Bauer, J.
Capra, S.
Isenring, E.
Title Are informal carers and community care workers effective in managing malnutrition in the older adult community? A systematic review of current evidence
Journal name Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1279-7707
1760-4788
Publication date 2013-01-16
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12603-013-0341-z
Volume 17
Issue 8
Start page 645
End page 651
Total pages 7
Place of publication Paris, France
Publisher Editions S E R D I
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Enhancing the effectiveness of the community and aged care workforce to prevent malnutrition and functional decline is important in reducing hospital and aged care facility demand.

Objective: To investigate the impact of nutrition-related interventions delivered to or by informal carers and non-clinical community care workers on malnutrition-related health outcomes of community-dwelling older adults (≥65years).

Methods: Intervention studies were searched for using six electronic databases for English-language publications from January 1980 to 30 May 2012.

Results: Nine studies were eligible for inclusion. The strength and quality of the evidence was moderate (six studies with level II intervention evidence, five with positive quality). Types of interventions used were highly varied. The majority of interventions were delivered to informal carers (6 studies), with three of these studies also involving older adult care recipients. Five interventions were targeted at identifying, preventing and/or treating malnutrition specifically (two positive quality, three neutral quality, n=2368). As a result of these interventions, nutritional status improved or stabilized (two positive quality, two neutral quality, n=2333). No study reported an improvement in functional status but two successfully prevented further decline in their participants (two neutral quality, n=1097).

Conclusion: Interventions targeted at identifying, preventing and/or treating malnutrition were able to improve or prevent decline in nutritional and functional status, without increasing informal carer burden. The findings of this review support the involvement of non-clinical community care workers and informal carers as part of the nutritional care team for community-dwelling older adults.
Keyword Aged
Caregiver
Community
Malnutrition
Nutrition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 12 Aug 2013, 20:44:08 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences