Hydrocolloids in the digestive tract and related health implications

Gidley, Michael J. (2013) Hydrocolloids in the digestive tract and related health implications. Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science, 18 4: 371-378. doi:10.1016/j.cocis.2013.04.003


Author Gidley, Michael J.
Title Hydrocolloids in the digestive tract and related health implications
Journal name Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1359-0294
1879-0399
Publication date 2013-08-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.cocis.2013.04.003
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 4
Start page 371
End page 378
Total pages 8
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject 1606 Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
2507 Polymers and Plastics
1505 Colloid and Surface Chemistry
3110 Surfaces and Interfaces
Abstract Hydrocolloids in the form of polymeric ingredients as well as natural biopolymer assemblies provide much of the macroscopic structure of foods. The controlled disassembly of hydrocolloid-structured foods in the digestive tract determines numerous nutritional properties driven by the rates of passage, digestion, absorption, and fermentation. Despite convincing evidence for health benefits of hydrocolloids (particularly dietary fibre) from epidemiology, and numerous in vitro model system studies, the detailed underlying mechanisms operating in the digestive tract are currently understood to only a limited extent. Distinct hydrocolloid-based processes occur in each of the gastric, small intestinal and large intestinal environments, with significant biological cross-talk between the sites. Hydrocolloids offer a major opportunity to tailor nutritional value and provide potential health benefits through control of gastric emptying and ileal brake mechanisms (satiety and potentially obesity), glycemic response (diabetes), plasma cholesterol levels (cardiovascular disease), and carbohydrate fermentation throughout the large intestine (colon cancer). There is often a parallel between the functionality of the plant-based foods which the human digestive tract evolved to digest and the use of extracted hydrocolloids in modern food structuring technology.
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• A major role for hydrocolloids in foods for health is inferred from epidemiology.
• Underlying health-benefiting mechanisms of hydrocolloids are not yet defined.
• Hydrocolloids influence diverse processes in stomach, small and large intestines.
• Evolutionary considerations provide insight into hydrocolloid functionality.

Hydrocolloids in the form of polymeric ingredients as well as natural biopolymer assemblies provide much of the macroscopic structure of foods. The controlled disassembly of hydrocolloid-structured foods in the digestive tract determines numerous nutritional properties driven by the rates of passage, digestion, absorption, and fermentation. Despite convincing evidence for health benefits of hydrocolloids (particularly dietary fibre) from epidemiology, and numerous in vitro model system studies, the detailed underlying mechanisms operating in the digestive tract are currently understood to only a limited extent. Distinct hydrocolloid-based processes occur in each of the gastric, small intestinal and large intestinal environments, with significant biological cross-talk between the sites. Hydrocolloids offer a major opportunity to tailor nutritional value and provide potential health benefits through control of gastric emptying and ileal brake mechanisms (satiety and potentially obesity), glycemic response (diabetes), plasma cholesterol levels (cardiovascular disease), and carbohydrate fermentation throughout the large intestine (colon cancer). There is often a parallel between the functionality of the plant-based foods which the human digestive tract evolved to digest and the use of extracted hydrocolloids in modern food structuring technology.
Keyword Hydrocolloid
Digestion
Fermentation
Bioaccessibility
Satiety
Glycemia
Cholesterol
Cell wall analogs
Dietary fiber
In-vivo
Arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides
Antropyloroduodenal motility
Physicochemical properties
Glycemic variability
Hormone-release
Food digestion
Fat emulsions
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official 2014 Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 48 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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