Protected Areas in South Asia Have Not Prevented Habitat Loss: A Study Using Historical Models of Land-Use Change

Clark, Natalie E., Boakes, Elizabeth H., McGowan, Philip J. K., Mace, Georgina M. and Fuller, Richard A. (2013) Protected Areas in South Asia Have Not Prevented Habitat Loss: A Study Using Historical Models of Land-Use Change. PLoS ONE, 8 5: e65298.1-e65298.6. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065298


Author Clark, Natalie E.
Boakes, Elizabeth H.
McGowan, Philip J. K.
Mace, Georgina M.
Fuller, Richard A.
Title Protected Areas in South Asia Have Not Prevented Habitat Loss: A Study Using Historical Models of Land-Use Change
Journal name PLoS ONE   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-05-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0065298
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 5
Start page e65298.1
End page e65298.6
Total pages 7
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Subject 1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
2700 Medicine
Abstract Habitat loss imperils species both locally and globally, so protection of intact habitat is critical for slowing the rate of biodiversity decline. Globally, more than 150,000 protected areas have been designated with a goal of protecting species and ecosystems, but whether they can continue to achieve this goal as human impacts escalate is unknown. Here we show that in South Asia, one of the world's major growth epicentres, the trajectory of habitat conversion rates inside protected areas is indistinguishable from that on unprotected lands, and habitat conversion rates do not decline following gazettement of a protected area. Moreover, a quarter of the land inside South Asia's protected areas is now classified as human modified. If the global community is to make significant progress towards the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi Target on protected areas, there is an urgent need both to substantially enhance management of these protected areas and to develop systematic conservation outside the formal protected area system.
Formatted abstract
Habitat loss imperils species both locally and globally, so protection of intact habitat is critical for slowing the rate of biodiversity decline. Globally, more than 150,000 protected areas have been designated with a goal of protecting species and ecosystems, but whether they can continue to achieve this goal as human impacts escalate is unknown. Here we show that in South Asia, one of the world's major growth epicentres, the trajectory of habitat conversion rates inside protected areas is indistinguishable from that on unprotected lands, and habitat conversion rates do not decline following gazettement of a protected area. Moreover, a quarter of the land inside South Asia's protected areas is now classified as human modified. If the global community is to make significant progress towards the Convention on Biological Diversity's Aichi Target on protected areas, there is an urgent need both to substantially enhance management of these protected areas and to develop systematic conservation outside the formal protected area system.
Keyword Andhari Tiger Reserve
Global Biodiversity
Gap Analysis
Forest Loss
Vegetation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID F/07058/AK
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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