Environmental markets: what do we learn from the lab?

Friesen, Lana and Gangadharan, Lata (2013) Environmental markets: what do we learn from the lab?. Journal of Economic Surveys, 27 3: 515-535. doi:10.1111/joes.12021


Author Friesen, Lana
Gangadharan, Lata
Title Environmental markets: what do we learn from the lab?
Journal name Journal of Economic Surveys   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0950-0804
1467-6419
Publication date 2013-07-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/joes.12021
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 27
Issue 3
Start page 515
End page 535
Total pages 21
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract In recent years, some of the most influential policies have been either tested or evaluated using experimental methods. Experiments have provided significant insights on the implications of different designs on market outcomes and the lessons learned have helped improve academic debate and the interaction between policy makers and researchers. In this paper, we provide an overview of experiments relating to environmental markets. Expenditure on environmental programs has been growing in importance yet it is controversial in current times due to the fiscal cuts around the world. Finding cost-effective ways of reaching environmental goals is thus an objective of most governments. Research using experiments can help isolate how individuals and regulators would respond to incentives and therefore identify the most effective programs.
Formatted abstract
In recent years, some of the most influential policies have been either tested or evaluated using experimental methods. Experiments have provided significant insights on the implications of different designs on market outcomes and the lessons learned have helped improve academic debate and the interaction between policy makers and researchers. In this paper, we provide an overview of experiments relating to environmental markets. Expenditure on environmental programs has been growing in importance yet it is controversial in current times due to the fiscal cuts around the world. Finding cost-effective ways of reaching environmental goals is thus an objective of most governments. Research using experiments can help isolate how individuals and regulators would respond to incentives and therefore identify the most effective programs.
Keyword Environmental policy
Laboratory experiments
Emission permit markets
Nonpoint-source pollution
Laboratory experiments
Water markets
Price discovery
Trading programs
Auctions
Design
Economics
Mechanism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: A Collection Of Surveys On Market Experiments

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Economics Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 14 Jul 2013, 10:14:12 EST by System User on behalf of School of Economics