What qualities are valued in residential direct care workers from the perspective of people with an intellectual disability and managers of accommodation services?

Dodevska, G. A. and Vassos, M. V. (2013) What qualities are valued in residential direct care workers from the perspective of people with an intellectual disability and managers of accommodation services?. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 57 7: 601-615. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01565.x


Author Dodevska, G. A.
Vassos, M. V.
Title What qualities are valued in residential direct care workers from the perspective of people with an intellectual disability and managers of accommodation services?
Journal name Journal of Intellectual Disability Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0964-2633
1365-2788
Publication date 2013-07-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2788.2012.01565.x
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 57
Issue 7
Start page 601
End page 615
Total pages 15
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background To date, the descriptions of a ‘good’ direct care worker used to recruit workers for disability services have largely been drawn up by managerial professionals in charge of hiring supports for people with disabilities. However, previous research highlights that these professionals conceptualise a ‘good’ direct care worker differently from service users with an intellectual disability (ID), with professionals placing an emphasis on describing workers with a range of practical skills and knowledge and service users placing an emphasis on describing workers with interpersonal skills. The aim of this research was to replicate this finding using a methodological approach that rectifies some of the weaknesses of previous research in this field.

Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted to explore the qualities that are valued in residential direct care workers (RDCWs) from the perspective of seven residents with ID and seven managers of accommodation services located in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia.

Results Thematic and chi-squared analysis confirmed the findings of previous research with residents with an ID placing more of an emphasis on the interpersonal behaviours of RDCWs in their descriptions compared to the managers.

Conclusions The interpersonal skills of a potential worker along with their practical skills and knowledge must be considered when recruiting RDCWs. It is also implied that given the different conceptualisation of a ‘good’ direct care worker across service users and professionals, increased service user participation in the organisation of appropriate supports is warranted.
Keyword Direct care workers
Intellectual disability
Management
Opinion
Skills
Active support
Community residences
User participation
Disabled people
Staff
Burnout
Implementation
Dissemination
Emotion
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 8 MAY 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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