Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum among children after a school excursion to an adventure farm, South West England

Hoek, M. R., Oliver, I., Barlow, M., Heard, L., Chalmers, R. and Paynter, S. (2008) Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum among children after a school excursion to an adventure farm, South West England. Journal of Water and Health, 6 3: 333-338. doi:10.2166/wh.2008.060


Author Hoek, M. R.
Oliver, I.
Barlow, M.
Heard, L.
Chalmers, R.
Paynter, S.
Title Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum among children after a school excursion to an adventure farm, South West England
Formatted title
Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum among children after a school excursion to an adventure farm, South West England
Journal name Journal of Water and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-8920
Publication date 2008-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2166/wh.2008.060
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 6
Issue 3
Start page 333
End page 338
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher I W A Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We present the results of an outbreak investigation on a Cryptosporidium parvum outbreak among 35 people, (27 students and 8 teachers), who participated in a school excursion to an outdoor adventure farm in South West England, from 22 to 26 May 2006. A cohort study was implemented to investigate possible sources of infection during the farm visit. The most likely transmission route was contact with faecally contaminated surface water following heavy rainfall, or consumption of water from the private well. Disinfection of the water reservoir was by chlorination, to which cryptosporidium is resistant. Supplemental disinfection or filtration methods of private water supplies on livestock farms may be needed. This study highlights the fact that epidemiological investigations of outbreaks as a result of environmental exposures are complex but important to inform the public and health professionals of the risks posed by private water supplies and outdoor activities. This is particularly so after heavy rainfall, as this may result in an increased effluent from faecally contaminated land, causing a wide variety of pathogens to wash into surface water and potentially, private wells. This poses risks for public health.
Keyword Faecal contamination
Heavy rainfall
Outdoor activities
Private wells
Surface water
Zoonoses
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 28 Jun 2013, 20:05:59 EST by Dr Stuart Paynter on behalf of School of Public Health