Longitudinal associations of importance of religion and frequency of service attendance with depression risk among adolescents in Nova Scotia

Rasic, Daniel, Asbridge, Mark, Kisely, Steve and Langille, Donald (2013) Longitudinal associations of importance of religion and frequency of service attendance with depression risk among adolescents in Nova Scotia. Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 58 5: 291-299. doi:10.1177/070674371305800507

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Author Rasic, Daniel
Asbridge, Mark
Kisely, Steve
Langille, Donald
Title Longitudinal associations of importance of religion and frequency of service attendance with depression risk among adolescents in Nova Scotia
Journal name Canadian Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0706-7437
1497-0015
Publication date 2013-05-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/070674371305800507
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 58
Issue 5
Start page 291
End page 299
Total pages 9
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, California, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: To examine the directionality of associations between self-reported religious importance or worship attendance and depression among adolescents, and to determine whether social supports or general self-efficacy are mechanisms of observed associations. Method: A cohort (n = 976) of Canadian high school students were surveyed in Grade 10 (2000 to 2001) and 2 years later (2002 to 2003). Logistic regression was conducted separately among adolescents with and without elevated depressive symptoms to examine associations between baseline religious attendance and religious importance with later depression, adjusting for confounding factors. Effects of reverse causation were also assessed, determining associations between baseline depression and follow-up religious attendance and importance. Results: Girls who were not depressed at baseline and who attended religious services had lower odds of later depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.46; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.95, P < 0.05), which was accounted for by general self-efficacy. Boys who were depressed at baseline who attended religious services had lower odds of still being depressed at followup (AOR 0.23; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.80, P < 0.01). Depression at baseline predicted lower attendance at follow-up among boys (AOR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.75, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Religious attendance independently predicts lower depression at followup among girls, and may do so by increasing self-efficacy. Among boys with depression, religious attendance predicts a lower likelihood of still being depressed at follow-up. The relation between religious attendance and depression in boys is bidirectional.
Formatted abstract
Objective: To examine the directionality of associations between self-reported religious importance or worship attendance and depression among adolescents, and to determine whether social supports or general self-efficacy are mechanisms of observed associations.

Method: A cohort (n = 976) of Canadian high school students were surveyed in Grade 10 (2000 to 2001) and 2 years later (2002 to 2003). Logistic regression was conducted separately among adolescents with and without elevated depressive symptoms to examine associations between baseline religious attendance and religious importance with later depression, adjusting for confounding factors. Effects of reverse causation were also assessed, determining associations between baseline depression and follow-up religious attendance and importance.

Results: Girls who were not depressed at baseline and who attended religious services had lower odds of later depression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.46; 95% CI 0.22 to 0.95, P < 0.05), which was accounted for by general self-efficacy. Boys who were depressed at baseline who attended religious services had lower odds of still being depressed at followup (AOR 0.23; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.80, P < 0.01). Depression at baseline predicted lower attendance at follow-up among boys (AOR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.75, P < 0.01).

Conclusions: Religious attendance independently predicts lower depression at followup among girls, and may do so by increasing self-efficacy. Among boys with depression, religious attendance predicts a lower likelihood of still being depressed at follow-up. The relation between religious attendance and depression in boys is bidirectional.
Keyword Religion
Depression
Adolescents
Longitudinal
Self-efficacy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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