Dissemination of an evidence-based telephone-delivered lifestyle intervention: factors associated with successful implementation and evaluation

Goode, Ana D. and Eakin, Elizabeth G. (2013) Dissemination of an evidence-based telephone-delivered lifestyle intervention: factors associated with successful implementation and evaluation. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 3 4: 351-356. doi:10.1007/s13142-013-0219-y

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Author Goode, Ana D.
Eakin, Elizabeth G.
Title Dissemination of an evidence-based telephone-delivered lifestyle intervention: factors associated with successful implementation and evaluation
Journal name Translational Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1869-6716
1613-9860
Publication date 2013-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s13142-013-0219-y
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 3
Issue 4
Start page 351
End page 356
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract To inform wider-scale dissemination efforts of health behavior change interventions, we need to better understand factors associated with successful implementation and evaluation in nonresearch settings. Using the experience of the Optimal Health Program dissemination (OHP), a 12-month evidence-based telephone-delivered intervention for physical activity, healthy eating, and weight loss, we provide a detailed account according to the reach, efficacy/effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance (RE-AIM) framework of the supports that were needed to facilitate the delivery and evaluation of the program in an applied community-based primary health care setting. Substantial initial research support including development of data collection procedures, staff training in intervention protocols, and ongoing support for fidelity of data collection and intervention delivery, as well as evaluation and reporting of outcomes was required. The RE-AIM framework can highlight common elements that will require attention from researchers to promote success of programs in applied settings.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 14 Jun 2013, 20:44:57 EST by Ana Goode on behalf of School of Public Health