Video feedback on functional task performance improves self-awareness after traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

Schmidt, Julia, Fleming, Jennifer, Ownsworth, Tamara and Lannin, Natasha A. (2013) Video feedback on functional task performance improves self-awareness after traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 27 4: 316-324. doi:10.1177/1545968312469838


Author Schmidt, Julia
Fleming, Jennifer
Ownsworth, Tamara
Lannin, Natasha A.
Title Video feedback on functional task performance improves self-awareness after traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial
Journal name Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1545-9683
1552-6844
Publication date 2013-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1545968312469838
Volume 27
Issue 4
Start page 316
End page 324
Total pages 9
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Feedback is used in rehabilitation to improve self-awareness in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but
there have been no comparisons of the different methods of providing feedback. Objective. To compare the effect of different
methods of feedback on impaired self-awareness after TBI.

Method: This was a randomized, assessor-blinded trial with concealed allocation. A total of 54 participants with TBI and impaired self-awareness (85% male) were recruited from inpatient and community rehabilitation settings. Participants performed a meal preparation task on 4 occasions and were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 feedback intervention groups: video plus verbal feedback, verbal feedback, or experiential feedback. The primary outcome was improvement in online awareness measured by the number of errors made during task completion. Secondary outcomes included level of intellectual awareness, self-perception of rehabilitation, and emotional status.

Results: Receiving video plus verbal feedback reduced the number of errors more than verbal feedback alone (mean
difference = 19.7 errors; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.2-30.1) and experiential feedback alone (mean difference = 12.4
errors; 95% CI = 1.8-23.0).

Conclusion:
The results suggest that the video plus verbal feedback approach used in this study was effective in improving self-awareness in people with TBI. The results also provide evidence that improvement in selfawareness was not accompanied by deterioration in emotional status.
Keyword Cognition
Rehabilitation
Occupational therapy
Neuropsychology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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