A social-ecological approach to conservation planning: embedding social considerations

Ban, Natalie C., Mills, Morena, Tam, Jordan, Hicks, Christina C., Klain, Sarah, Stoeckl, Natalie, Bottrill, Madeleine C., Levine, Jordan, Pressey, Robert L., Satterfield, Terre and Chan, Kai M. A. (2013) A social-ecological approach to conservation planning: embedding social considerations. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 11 4: 194-202. doi:10.1890/110205

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Author Ban, Natalie C.
Mills, Morena
Tam, Jordan
Hicks, Christina C.
Klain, Sarah
Stoeckl, Natalie
Bottrill, Madeleine C.
Levine, Jordan
Pressey, Robert L.
Satterfield, Terre
Chan, Kai M. A.
Title A social-ecological approach to conservation planning: embedding social considerations
Journal name Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1540-9295
1540-9309
Publication date 2013-05-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1890/110205
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 11
Issue 4
Start page 194
End page 202
Total pages 9
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Language eng
Abstract Many conservation plans remain unimplemented, in part because of insufficient consideration of the social processes that influence conservation decisions. Complementing social considerations with an integrated understanding of the ecology of a region can result in a more complete conservation approach. We suggest that linking conservation planning to a social-ecological systems (SES) framework can lead to a more thorough understanding of human-environment interactions and more effective integration of social considerations. By characterizing SES as a set of subsystems, and their interactions with each other and with external factors, the SES framework can improve our understanding of the linkages between social and ecological influences on the environment. Using this framework can help to identify socially and ecologically focused conservation actions that will benefit ecosystems and human communities, and assist in the development of more consistent evidence for evaluating conservation actions by comparing conservation case studies.
Keyword Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
ECOLOGY
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP1096453
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 138 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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