Fruit, Mediterranean-style, and high-fat and -sugar diets are associated with the risk of night sweats and hot flushes in midlife: results from a prospective cohort study

Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M. and Mishra, Gita D. (2013) Fruit, Mediterranean-style, and high-fat and -sugar diets are associated with the risk of night sweats and hot flushes in midlife: results from a prospective cohort study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 97 5: 1092-1099. doi:10.3945/ajcn.112.049965


Author Herber-Gast, Gerrie-Cor M.
Mishra, Gita D.
Title Fruit, Mediterranean-style, and high-fat and -sugar diets are associated with the risk of night sweats and hot flushes in midlife: results from a prospective cohort study
Journal name American Journal of Clinical Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9165
1938-3207
Publication date 2013-05-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.112.049965
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 97
Issue 5
Start page 1092
End page 1099
Total pages 8
Place of publication Bethesda, MD, United States
Publisher American Society for Nutrition
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Diet has been suggested to be a potential risk factor for vasomotor menopausal symptoms (VMSs), ie, hot flushes and night sweats.
Objective: We investigated the associations between dietary patterns and risk of VMSs by using data from middle-aged women born between 1946 and 1951 in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.
Design: A prospective cohort study of 6040 women with a natural menopause were followed up at 3-y intervals over 9 y. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline in 2001, and the presence of VMSs was assessed at baseline and follow-up. Factor analysis and generalized estimating equation models for binary repeated measures were performed.
Results: Six dietary patterns were identified from factor analysis: cooked vegetables, fruit, Mediterranean style, meat and processed meat, dairy, and high fat and sugar. A higher consumption of the fruit or Mediterranean-style diet was inversely associated with VMSs in a comparison of the top with the bottom quintile, with adjusted ORs of 0.81 (95% CI: 0.71, 0.93; P-trend = 0.0009) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.92; P-trend = 0.0004), respectively. The highfat and -sugar pattern increased the risk of VMSs in a comparison of the top with the bottom quintile, with an adjusted OR of 1.23 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.44; P-trend = 0.02).
Conclusions: Consumption of a fruit or Mediterranean-style diet decreased the risk of reporting VMSs, whereas consumption of a high-fat and -sugar diet increased the risk of VMSs. These results may eventually lead to a basis for the development of dietary preventive measures for VMSs.
Keyword Healthy Postmenopausal Women
Vasomotor Symptoms
Hormone-Levels
Endothelial Dysfunction
Cardiovascular-Disease
Plasma-Concentrations
Physical-Activity
Breast-Cancer
Patterns
Flashes
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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