The co-occurrence of common mental and physical disorders within Australian families: a national population-based study

Saha, Sukanta, Stedman, Terry J., Scott, James G. and McGrath, John J. (2013) The co-occurrence of common mental and physical disorders within Australian families: a national population-based study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 47 8: 754-761. doi:10.1177/0004867413486841


Author Saha, Sukanta
Stedman, Terry J.
Scott, James G.
McGrath, John J.
Title The co-occurrence of common mental and physical disorders within Australian families: a national population-based study
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2013-05-29
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/0004867413486841
Open Access Status
Volume 47
Issue 8
Start page 754
End page 761
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: Because comorbidity between mental and physical disorders is commonly found in patients, it would be expected that this pattern would also be reflected at the family level. During a recent population-based survey of common mental disorders, respondents were asked about the presence of selected mental and physical disorders in their relatives. The aim of this research was to describe the within-family co-occurrence of selected common physical and mental disorders in a population-based sample.
Formatted abstract
Objective: Because comorbidity between mental and physical disorders is commonly found in patients, it would be  expected that this pattern would also be reflected at the family level. During a recent population-based survey of  common mental disorders, respondents were asked about the presence of selected mental and physical disorders in  their relatives. The aim of this research was to describe the within-family co-occurrence of selected common physical and mental disorders in a population-based sample.

Methods: Subjects were drawn from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing 2007. A modified  version of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI 3.0, henceforth CIDI) was used to identify lifetime-ever common psychiatric disorders (anxiety disorders, depression, drug or alcohol disorders). The respondents were asked if any of their relatives had one of a list of psychiatric (anxiety, bipolar disorder, depression, drug or alcohol problem, schizophrenia) or general physical disorders (cancer, heart problems, intellectual disability, memory problems). We examined the relationship between the variables of interest using logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounding factors.

Results: Compared to otherwise-well respondents, those who had a CIDI diagnosis of major depressive disorders,  anxiety disorders, or drug or alcohol abuse/dependence were significantly more likely to have first-degree relatives with  (a) the same diagnosis as the respondent, (b) other mental disorders not identified in the respondent, and (c) a broad  range of general physical conditions.

Conclusions: Individuals with common mental disorders report greater familial co-occurrence for a range of mental  and physical disorders. When eliciting family histories, clinicians should remain mindful that both mental and physical  disorders can co-occur within families.
Keyword Epidemiology
Family history
Depression
Anxiety
Drug or alcohol disorders
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 04 Jun 2013, 21:01:58 EST by Sheila Cleary on behalf of Psychiatry - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital