Influence of human immunodeficiency virus-antibody testing on sexual-behavior in a high-risk population from a low-risk city

Frazer, I.H., McCamish, M., Hay, I. and North, P. (1988) Influence of human immunodeficiency virus-antibody testing on sexual-behavior in a high-risk population from a low-risk city. Medical Journal of Australia, 149 7: 365-368.

Author Frazer, I.H.
McCamish, M.
Hay, I.
North, P.
Title Influence of human immunodeficiency virus-antibody testing on sexual-behavior in a high-risk population from a low-risk city
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 1988-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 149
Issue 7
Start page 365
End page 368
Total pages 4
Place of publication Strawberry Hills, Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A survey was undertaken of homosexual and bisexual men in Brisbane to establish whether knowledge of their human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-antibody status had influenced any sexual behaviour that was likely to spread HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Of the 318 respondents, 123 respondents knew their HIV serological status, and 13 of these were HIV seropositive. Of the 195 respondents who previously had not been tested, 10 individuals proved to be HIV seropositive. Eighty-two per cent of subjects stated that they had reduced their sexual activity because of their awareness of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); this reduction was equally common among those who had or had not previously had their HIV serological status checked. Anal intercourse was practised most frequently by those subjects who were HIV seropositive and were not aware of it; nevertheless, unprotected anal intercourse was common among subjects who knew their HIV serological status, including those who knew that they were HIV seropositive. Eighty-nine of 208 subjects who were practising anal intercourse had never used a condom. Usage of a condom was marginally more common among those subjects who previously had been tested for the presence of HIV antibodies (P = 0.06), and this was particularly so for those subjects who knew that they were HIV seropositive (P < 0.01). Condom usage was no more common among those subjects who knew that they were HIV seronegative, when compared with those subjects who did not know their status. These data show that knowledge of a negative HIV-antibody test-result has no substantial association with safer sexual behaviour and suggest that whereas targeted information programmes have had some impact on behaviour in high-risk groups in Brisbane, by the end of July 1986, these programmes had not yet resulted in safer sexual practices by the majority of homosexual and bisexual men.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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