Temporal association between changes in primary sensory cortex and corticomotor output during muscle pain

Schabrun, S. M., Jones, E., Kloster, J. and Hodges, P. W. (2013) Temporal association between changes in primary sensory cortex and corticomotor output during muscle pain. Neuroscience, 235 159-164. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2012.12.072


Author Schabrun, S. M.
Jones, E.
Kloster, J.
Hodges, P. W.
Title Temporal association between changes in primary sensory cortex and corticomotor output during muscle pain
Journal name Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4522
1873-7544
Publication date 2013-04-03
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2012.12.072
Volume 235
Start page 159
End page 164
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Integration of information between multiple cortical regions is thought to underpin the experience of pain. Yet studies tend to focus on pain related changes in discrete cortical regions. Although altered processing in the primary motor (M1) and sensory cortex (S1) is implicated in pain, the temporal relationship between these regions is unknown and may provide insight into the interaction between them.
Methods: We used recordings of somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) and transcranial magnetic stimulation to investigate the temporal relationship between altered excitability of the primary sensory cortex and corticomotor output during and after muscle pain induced by hypertonic saline infusion into the right first dorsal interosseous. SEPs and motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded in 12 healthy individuals.
Results: Participants reported an average pain intensity of 5.4 (0.5) on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. The area of the N20–P25–N33 complex of the SEP was reduced during and after pain, but MEP amplitudes were suppressed only after pain had resolved.
Conclusions: Our data show that pain reduces sensory processing before motor output is altered. This temporal dispersion, coupled with the lack of correlation between pain-induced changes in S1 and M1 excitability, imply either that independent processes are involved, or that reduced excitability of S1 during acute experimental muscle pain mediates latent reductions in motor output via processes that are non-linear and potentially involve activation of a wider brain network.
Keyword Experimental muscle pain
Primary motor cortex
Primary sensory cortex
Somatosensory-evoked potentials
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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