Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood

Chan, Gary C. K., Kelly, Adrian B. and Toumbourou, John W. (2013) Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 74 3: 396-405. doi:10.15288/jsad.2013.74.396

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ298635_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 418.17KB 0

Author Chan, Gary C. K.
Kelly, Adrian B.
Toumbourou, John W.
Title Accounting for the association of family conflict and heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls: the role of depressed mood
Journal name Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1937-1888
1938-4114
Publication date 2013-05-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.15288/jsad.2013.74.396
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 74
Issue 3
Start page 396
End page 405
Total pages 10
Place of publication Piscataway, NJ, United States
Publisher Alcohol Research Documentation
Language eng
Abstract Objective: Heavy alcohol use increases dramatically at age 14, and there is emerging cross-sectional evidence that when girls experience family conflict at younger ages (11-13 years) the risk of alcohol use and misuse is high. This study evaluated the role of family conflict and subsequent depressed mood in predicting heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls. Method: This was a three-wave longitudinal study with annual assessments (modal ages 12, 13, and 14 years). The participants (N = 886, 57% female) were from 12 metropolitan schools in Victoria, Australia, and participants completed questionnaires during school class time. The key measures were based on the Communities That Care Youth Survey and included family conflict (Wave 1), depressed mood (Wave 2), and heavy alcohol use (Wave 3). Control variables included school commitment, number of peers who consumed alcohol, whether parents were living together, and ethnic background. Results: With all controls in the model, depressed mood at Wave 2 was predicted by family conflict at Wave 1. The interaction of family conflict with gender was significant, with girls showing a stronger association of family conflict and depressed mood. Depressed mood at Wave 2 predicted heavy alcohol use at Wave 3. Conclusions: Girls may be especially vulnerable to family conflict, and subsequent depressed mood increases the risk of heavy alcohol use. The results support the need for gender-sensitive family-oriented prevention programs delivered in late childhood and early adolescence. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs, 74, 396-405, 2013)
Formatted abstract
Objective: Heavy alcohol use increases dramatically at age 14, and there is emerging cross-sectional evidence that when girls experience family conflict at younger ages (11-13 years) the risk of alcohol use and misuse is high. This study evaluated the role of family conflict and subsequent depressed mood in predicting heavy alcohol use among adolescent girls.

Method: This was a three-wave longitudinal study with annual assessments (modal ages 12, 13, and 14 years). The participants (N = 886, 57% female) were from 12 metropolitan schools in Victoria, Australia, and participants completed questionnaires during school class time. The key measures were based on the Communities That Care Youth Survey and included family conflict (Wave 1), depressed mood (Wave 2), and heavy alcohol use (Wave 3). Control variables included school commitment, number of peers who consumed alcohol, whether parents were living together, and ethnic background.

Results: With all controls in the model, depressed mood at Wave 2 was predicted by family conflict at Wave 1. The interaction of family conflict with gender was significant, with girls showing a stronger association of family conflict and depressed mood. Depressed mood at Wave 2 predicted heavy alcohol use at Wave 3.

Conclusions: Girls may be especially vulnerable to family conflict, and subsequent depressed mood increases the risk of heavy alcohol use. The results support the need for gender-sensitive family-oriented prevention programs delivered in late childhood and early adolescence.
Keyword Substance Abuse
Psychology
Substance Abuse
Psychology
PSYCHOLOGY
SUBSTANCE ABUSE, SCI
SUBSTANCE ABUSE, SSCI
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 251721
DP1095883
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 20 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 28 Apr 2013, 10:28:51 EST by System User on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse