Semi-ownership and sterilisation of cats and dogs in Thailand

Toukhsati, Samia R., Phillips, Clive J. C., Podberscek, Anthony L. and Coleman, Grahame J. (2012) Semi-ownership and sterilisation of cats and dogs in Thailand. Animals, 2 4: 611-627. doi:10.3390/ani2040611

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Author Toukhsati, Samia R.
Phillips, Clive J. C.
Podberscek, Anthony L.
Coleman, Grahame J.
Title Semi-ownership and sterilisation of cats and dogs in Thailand
Journal name Animals   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2076-2615
Publication date 2012-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/ani2040611
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 2
Issue 4
Start page 611
End page 627
Total pages 17
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher M D P I AG
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of cat and dog semi-ownership in Thailand and factors that predict sterilisation. Semi-ownership was defined as interacting/caring for a companion animal that the respondent does not own, such as a stray cat or dog. A randomised telephone survey recruited 494 Thai nationals residing in Thailand. The findings revealed that 14% of respondents (n = 71) engaged in dog semi-ownership and only 17% of these dogs had been sterilised. Similarly, 11% of respondents (n = 55) engaged in cat semi-ownership and only 7% were known to be sterilised. Using Hierarchical Multiple Regression, the findings showed that 62% and 75% of the variance in intentions to sterilise semi-owned dogs and cats, respectively, was predicted by religious beliefs, and psychosocial factors such as attitudes, perceived pressure from others, and perceived behavioural control. Community awareness campaigns that approach the issue of sterilisation in a way that is consistent with cultural and religious traditions using Thai role models, such as veterinarians, may go some way in reducing stray animal population growth.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 15 Apr 2013, 19:34:13 EST by Professor Clive Phillips on behalf of Centre for Animal Welfare and Ethics