Siblings, theory of mind, and executive functioning in children aged 3–6 years: new longitudinal evidence

McAlister, Anna R. and Peterson, Candida C. (2013) Siblings, theory of mind, and executive functioning in children aged 3–6 years: new longitudinal evidence. Child Development, 84 4: 1442-1458. doi:10.1111/cdev.12043


Author McAlister, Anna R.
Peterson, Candida C.
Title Siblings, theory of mind, and executive functioning in children aged 3–6 years: new longitudinal evidence
Journal name Child Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0009-3920
1467-8624
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/cdev.12043
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 84
Issue 4
Start page 1442
End page 1458
Total pages 17
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Longitudinal data were obtained from 157 children aged 3 years 3 months to 5 years 6 months at Time 1. At Time 2 these children had aged an average of 12 months. Theory of mind (ToM) and executive functioning (EF) were measured at both time points. Results suggest that Time 1 ToM scores predict Time 2 EF scores. Detailed examination of sibling influences suggests that benefits—in terms of advanced ToM development—accrue to children with siblings versus without, and to those with a larger number of child-aged siblings. Any advance in either area (ToM or EF) is likely to benefit the other, and early sibling interaction appears to act as a catalyst.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 17 DEC 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 36 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 45 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 14 Apr 2013, 23:27:23 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology