Love thine enemy? Evidence that (ir)religious identification can promote outgroup tolerance under threat

Ysseldyk, Renate, Haslam, Alexander, Matheson, Kimberly and Anisman, Hymie (2012) Love thine enemy? Evidence that (ir)religious identification can promote outgroup tolerance under threat. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 15 1: 105-117. doi:10.1177/1368430211410996


Author Ysseldyk, Renate
Haslam, Alexander
Matheson, Kimberly
Anisman, Hymie
Title Love thine enemy? Evidence that (ir)religious identification can promote outgroup tolerance under threat
Journal name Group Processes and Intergroup Relations   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4302
1461-7188
Publication date 2012-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1368430211410996
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 105
End page 117
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The divide between religious traditionalists and secular humanists has been widening for decades; yet, little is known about factors that attenuate hostility between these groups. Two studies examined whether (ir)religious identification could mitigate negative feelings toward (ir)religious outgroups. Following priming to make salient religious groups in daily life or group-based threat, Atheists and Christians in Britain (Study 1, n = 113), and Atheists, Catholics, Jews, Muslims, and Protestants in Canada (Study 2, n = 181) reported intergroup feelings, ingroup evaluations, and perceptions of their group as viewed by others. Atheists reported the lowest ingroup identification and felt equally negative toward all religious groups. Likewise, religious group members generally felt most negative toward Atheists. However, identification with the (ir)religious ingroup was associated with less hostility toward the outgroup(s). This was particularly marked for Atheists who perceived that religious followers felt positively toward them. These results challenge suggestions that (ir)religious identification and threat necessarily promote intergroup hostility
Keyword Atheism
Identity
Religion
Threat
Tolerance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Apr 2013, 22:58:45 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology