Feeling bad about being sad: the role of social expectancies in ampllifying negative mood

Bastian, Brock, Kuppens, Peter, Hornsey, Matthew J., Park, Joonha, Koval, Peter and Uchida, Yukiko (2012) Feeling bad about being sad: the role of social expectancies in ampllifying negative mood. Emotion, 12 1: 69-80. doi:10.1037/a0024755


Author Bastian, Brock
Kuppens, Peter
Hornsey, Matthew J.
Park, Joonha
Koval, Peter
Uchida, Yukiko
Title Feeling bad about being sad: the role of social expectancies in ampllifying negative mood
Journal name Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1528-3542
1931-1516
Publication date 2012-02-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0024755
Volume 12
Issue 1
Start page 69
End page 80
Total pages 12
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract Our perception of how others expect us to feel has significant implications for our emotional functioning. Across 4 studies the authors demonstrate that when people think others expect them not to feel negative emotions (i.e., sadness) they experience more negative emotion and reduced well-being. The authors show that perceived social expectancies predict these differences in emotion and well-being both more consistently than-and independently of-personal expectancies and that they do so by promoting negative self-evaluation when experiencing negative emotion. We find evidence for these effects within Australia (Studies 1 and 2) as well as Japan (Study 2), although the effects of social expectancies are especially evident in the former (Studies 1 and 2). We also find experimental evidence for the causal role of social expectancies in negative emotional responses to negative emotional events (Studies 3 and 4). In short, when people perceive that others think they should feel happy, and not sad, this leads them to feel sad more frequently and intensely.
Keyword Culture
Emotion norms
Expectancies
Ruminative self-focus
Social appraisal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Online first: 25 July 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Apr 2013, 19:25:01 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology