Vitamin D and health in pregnancy, infants, children and adolescents in Australia and New Zealand: a position statement

Paxton, Georgia A., Teale, Glyn R., Nowson, Caryl A., Mason, Rebecca S., McGrath, John J., Thompson, Melanie J., Siafarikas, Aris, Rodda, Christine P. and Munns, Craig F. (2013) Vitamin D and health in pregnancy, infants, children and adolescents in Australia and New Zealand: a position statement. Medical Journal of Australia, 198 3: 1-8. doi:10.5694/mja11.11592


Author Paxton, Georgia A.
Teale, Glyn R.
Nowson, Caryl A.
Mason, Rebecca S.
McGrath, John J.
Thompson, Melanie J.
Siafarikas, Aris
Rodda, Christine P.
Munns, Craig F.
Title Vitamin D and health in pregnancy, infants, children and adolescents in Australia and New Zealand: a position statement
Journal name Medical Journal of Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-729X
1326-5377
Publication date 2013-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5694/mja11.11592
Volume 198
Issue 3
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 2
Place of publication Strawberry Hills, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Language eng
Abstract The recommended level for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in infants, children, adolescents and during pregnancy and lactation is ≥ 50 nmol/L. This level may need to be 10-20 nmol/L higher at the end of summer to maintain levels ≥ 50 nmol/L over winter and spring. • Sunlight is the most important source of vitamin D. The US recommended dietary allowance for vitamin D is 600 IU daily in children aged over 12 months and during pregnancy and lactation, assuming minimal sun exposure. • Risk factors for low vitamin D are: lack of skin exposure to sunlight, dark skin, southerly latitude, conditions affecting vitamin D metabolism and storage (including obesity) and, for infants, being born to a mother with low vitamin D and exclusive breastfeeding combined with at least one other risk factor. • Targeted measurement of 25(OH)D levels is recommended for infants, children and adolescents with at least one risk factor for low vitamin D and for pregnant women with at least one risk factor for low vitamin D at the first antenatal visit. • Vitamin D deficiency can be treated with daily low-dose vitamin D supplements, although barriers to adherence have been identified. High-dose intermittent vitamin D can be used in children and adolescents. Treatment should be paired with health education and advice about sensible sun exposure. Infants at risk of low vitamin D should be supplemented with 400 IU vitamin D3 daily for at least the first year of life. • There is increasing evidence of an association between low vitamin D and a range of non-bone health outcomes, however there is a lack of data from robust randomised controlled trials of vitamin D supplementation.
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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