Different concentrations of grape seed extract affect in vitro starch fermentation by porcine small and large intestinal inocula

Wang, Donjie, Williams, Barbara A., Ferruzzi, Mario G. and D'Arcy, Bruce R. (2012) Different concentrations of grape seed extract affect in vitro starch fermentation by porcine small and large intestinal inocula. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, 93 2: 276-283. doi:10.1002/jsfa.5753


Author Wang, Donjie
Williams, Barbara A.
Ferruzzi, Mario G.
D'Arcy, Bruce R.
Title Different concentrations of grape seed extract affect in vitro starch fermentation by porcine small and large intestinal inocula
Journal name Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-5142
1097-0010
Publication date 2012-07-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/jsfa.5753
Volume 93
Issue 2
Start page 276
End page 283
Total pages 8
Place of publication West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
BACKGROUND: Grape seed extract (GSE) phenolics have potential health-promoting properties, either from compounds present within the extract, or metabolites resulting from gastrointestinal tract (GIT) fermentation of these compounds. This study describes how GSE affected the kinetics and end-products of starch fermentation in vitro using pig intestinal and fecal inocula. Six GSE concentrations (0, 60, 125, 250, 500, and 750 µg ml−1 were fermented in vitro by porcine ileal and fecal microbiota using starch as the energy source. Cumulative gas production, and end-point short chain fatty acids and ammonia were measured.

RESULTS: GSE phenolics altered the pattern (gas kinetics, and end-products such as SCFA and NH+4) of starch fermentation by both inocula, at concentrations above 250 µg ml−1. Below this level, neither inoculum showed any significant (P > 0.05) effect of the GSE.

CONCLUSION: The results show that GSE phenolics at a concentration over 250 µg ml−1 can have measurable effects on microbial activity in an in vitro fermentation system, as evidenced by the changes in kinetics and end-products from starch fermentation. This suggests that fermentation patterns could be conceivably shifted in the actual GIT, though further evidence will be required from in vivo studies.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 6 July 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 26 Mar 2013, 23:26:42 EST by Dr Barbara Williams on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences