The Knowledge of Effective Parenting Scale (KEPS): a tool for public health approaches to universal parenting programs

Winter, Leanne, Morawska, Alina and Sanders, Matthew (2012) The Knowledge of Effective Parenting Scale (KEPS): a tool for public health approaches to universal parenting programs. Journal of Primary Prevention, 33 2-3: 85-97. doi:10.1007/s10935-012-0268-x


Author Winter, Leanne
Morawska, Alina
Sanders, Matthew
Title The Knowledge of Effective Parenting Scale (KEPS): a tool for public health approaches to universal parenting programs
Journal name Journal of Primary Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-095X
1573-6547
Publication date 2012-06-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10935-012-0268-x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 2-3
Start page 85
End page 97
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Abstract Improving the knowledge, skills, and confidence of parents is often the aim of parenting-focused public health strategies and parenting programs, yet research on parental knowledge is limited compared with research on other parenting variables. In this study, a nonclinical sample of 62 parents of children aged 2–3 years was assessed for knowledge of child development processes and milestones [using the Knowledge of Infant Development Inventory (KIDI)] and knowledge of effective parenting strategies [using the Knowledge of Effective Parenting Scale (KEPS)], along with self-reported measures of parenting dysfunction and nurturance, parental confidence, parental affective state, and problematic child behavior. Additionally, in-home observations of parent–child interactions were conducted with dependent measures of aversive and non-aversive parent behavior, a composite measure of parenting competence, and aversive child behavior. Results showed that KEPS scores were significantly negatively related to self-reported parenting dysfunction, internalized problematic child behavior, and parental anxiety, and positively related to observed parenting competence. Knowledge as assessed by the KIDI was significantly positively associated only with KEPS scores. These results suggest that increasing parental knowledge of effective parenting strategies at a population level is likely to be more beneficial to parents than increasing their knowledge of child development processes and milestones.
Keyword Parental knowledge
Parenting competence
Child behavior
Home visitation program
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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