Ipsilateral corticospinal responses to ballistic training are similar for various intensities and timings of TMS

Poh, E., Riek, S. and Carroll, T. J. (2013) Ipsilateral corticospinal responses to ballistic training are similar for various intensities and timings of TMS. Acta Physiologica, 207 2: 385-396. doi:10.1111/apha.12032


Author Poh, E.
Riek, S.
Carroll, T. J.
Title Ipsilateral corticospinal responses to ballistic training are similar for various intensities and timings of TMS
Journal name Acta Physiologica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1748-1708
1748-1716
Publication date 2013-02-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/apha.12032
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 207
Issue 2
Start page 385
End page 396
Total pages 12
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Aim In previous studies, unilateral ballistic training either increased or decreased corticospinal excitability for the untrained opposite limb. The objective here was to investigate whether these discrepancies can be explained by methodological differences such as the intensity of stimulation assessing excitability or the timing of excitability testing after training. Methods Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were elicited by stimulating the ipsilateral cortex at high intensity (70% MEPmax) and low intensity (20% MEPmax) at specific time-points after performance of 300 ballistic movements of the index finger. Results Ballistic practice significantly facilitated MEP size for high-intensity stimuli, whereas responses to low-intensity stimulation were variable. MEP sizes at individual time-points were not significantly facilitated until 4 min after training, although there was no difference between early and late responses when grouped over multiple time-points. Conclusions The data indicate that previous discrepancies in ipsilateral responses to ballistic training cannot be attributed to specific procedures used to assess corticospinal excitability as there was no tendency towards depression of MEP amplitude at any point post-exercise for both testing intensities. This suggests that other experimental factors such as locus of attention or availability of visual feedback are more likely to account for the discrepancies.
Formatted abstract
Aim: In previous studies, unilateral ballistic training either increased or decreased corticospinal excitability for the untrained opposite limb. The objective here was to investigate whether these discrepancies can be explained by methodological differences such as the intensity of stimulation assessing excitability or the timing of excitability testing after training.
Methods: Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were elicited by stimulating the ipsilateral cortex at high intensity (70% MEPmax) and low intensity (20% MEPmax) at specific time-points after performance of 300 ballistic movements of the index finger.
Results: Ballistic practice significantly facilitated MEP size for high-intensity stimuli, whereas responses to low-intensity stimulation were variable. MEP sizes at individual time-points were not significantly facilitated until 4 min after training, although there was no difference between early and late responses when grouped over multiple time-points.
Conclusions: The data indicate that previous discrepancies in ipsilateral responses to ballistic training cannot be attributed to specific procedures used to assess corticospinal excitability as there was no tendency towards depression of MEP amplitude at any point post-exercise for both testing intensities. This suggests that other experimental factors such as locus of attention or availability of visual feedback are more likely to account for the discrepancies.
Keyword Intensity
Ipsilateral corticospinal excitability
Motor evoked potentials
Time-course
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP1093193
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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