Smoking behaviour in pregnancy and its impact on smoking cessation at various intervals during follow-up over 21 years: a prospective cohort study

Rattan, D., Mamun, A., Najman, J. M., Williams, G. M. and Doi, S. A. (2013) Smoking behaviour in pregnancy and its impact on smoking cessation at various intervals during follow-up over 21 years: a prospective cohort study. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 120 3: 288-296. doi:10.1111/1471-0528.12027


Author Rattan, D.
Mamun, A.
Najman, J. M.
Williams, G. M.
Doi, S. A.
Title Smoking behaviour in pregnancy and its impact on smoking cessation at various intervals during follow-up over 21 years: a prospective cohort study
Journal name BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1470-0328
1471-0528
Publication date 2013-02-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1471-0528.12027
Volume 120
Issue 3
Start page 288
End page 296
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine whether mothers who quit or reduce their level of smoking in pregnancy comprise a group of health-conscious women who are disproportionally likely to adopt a healthier smoking lifestyle in the medium to longer term, compared with women who continue to smoke during pregnancy.

Design: A prospective cohort study.

Setting: A public hospital in Australia.

Population: A cohort of 6703 individual mothers who completed both initial phases of data collection in 1981–1983; mothers who smoked daily (2992) before pregnancy were included in this study.

Methods: Mothers were interviewed at 3–5 days post-delivery, 6 months, 5 years, 14 years and 21 years to determine their smoking status. An inverse probability-weighted Poisson regression with a robust error variance was fitted to the data using a log-link function and a binary response variable for smoking outcome, and adjusting for several possible confounding factors.

Main outcome measure: Smoking cessation at several follow-up points, for up to 21 years.

Results: Of the mothers who smoked daily before pregnancy, 12, 23, 37 and 41% reported having ceased smoking at 6 months and at 5, 14 and 21 years, respectively. The decision to quit smoking during pregnancy was found to be independently associated with a higher rate ratio (RR) of smoking cessation at 6 months (RR 30.60, 95% CI 20.50–45.69), 5 years (RR 4.36; 95% CI 3.61–5.27), 14 years (RR 2.42, 95% CI 2.12–2.75) and 21 years (RR 1.86; 95% CI 1.60–2.15), after adjusting for several possible confounding factors.

Conclusions: Pregnancy appears to be an opportunity for successfully quitting smoking, regardless of socio-economic circumstances or demographic background.
Keyword Cohort study
Pregnancy
Risk reduction behaviour
Smoking cessation
Smoking during pregnancy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online: 6 November 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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