Dirtgirlworld: corporate social responsibility and ethical consumption in the world of children'S television programming

Ward, Sue (2012) Dirtgirlworld: corporate social responsibility and ethical consumption in the world of children'S television programming. Media International Australia, 145: 29-38.

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Author Ward, Sue
Title Dirtgirlworld: corporate social responsibility and ethical consumption in the world of children'S television programming
Journal name Media International Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1329-878X
2200-467X
Publication date 2012-11-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
Issue 145
Start page 29
End page 38
Total pages 10
Place of publication St Lucia, QLD., Australia
Publisher University of Queensland, School of English, Media Studies & Art History
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Discussions in the field of ethical consumption usually refer to the mainstreaming
of ethical and environmental concerns that impact on consumer behaviour in the
consumption of food and material goods, and in some cases to television programs
(especially lifestyle and makeover programs) that acknowledge the environmentally
concerned viewer by encouraging the consumption of goods and services that
minimise environmental impact. These studies recognise the field of commodity
consumption as an important site for thinking about practices of identity-formation
and the construction of the self as a responsible, environmentally and ethically
concerned citizen who makes politically based decisions in everyday practice. But
rarely is a TV program itself presented as a green commodity produced with the
intention to be ecologically and ethically sound in its branded identity. This article
showcases the production and distribution of the preschool television program
dirtgirlworld as a response by ecologically minded individuals to engage with
the challenges of today’s environmental crises. This is a case study that connects
ethical consumption and corporate social responsibility with screen production and
distribution. The central thrust of this article is to posit the example of dirtgirlworld
as part of a global social movement towards a more ecologically sustainable
existence. However, the suggestion here is that this case study also lends itself to
much-needed conversation about how media studies can engage with our current
ecological crises beyond the practice of eco-criticsm.
Keyword Consumer Behavior
Television Programs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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