Is the socioeconomic gap in childhood exposure to secondhand smoke widening or narrowing?

Gartner, Coral E. and Hall, Wayne D. (2013) Is the socioeconomic gap in childhood exposure to secondhand smoke widening or narrowing?. Tobacco Control, 22 5: 344-348. doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050297

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Author Gartner, Coral E.
Hall, Wayne D.
Title Is the socioeconomic gap in childhood exposure to secondhand smoke widening or narrowing?
Journal name Tobacco Control   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0964-4563
1468-3318
Publication date 2013-09-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050297
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 22
Issue 5
Start page 344
End page 348
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BMJ Group
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective The social gradient in smoking contributes substantially to the health gap between the rich and poor. Passive smoking by children is associated with increased risk of more severe asthma, respiratory diseases and infections, middle ear disease and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. This study examined trends in the social gradient of children's exposure to secondhand smoke in Australian households between 2001 and 2010.
Design Series of cross-sectional national household surveys.
Results Between 2001 and 2010, the proportion of Australian households containing a child aged under 15 years and a smoker declined by 22%. However, there was no change in the most disadvantaged households, with half of these households still containing at least one smoker in 2010. There was a social gradient in outdoor smoking in all survey years but the prevalence of outdoor-only smoking increased in all socioeconomic groups by around 50% between 2001 and 2010. The presence of a child aged 5 years or younger in the household increased the chances that smokers only smoked outdoors.
Conclusions Children's exposure to indoor smoking in households that contain a smoker is declining in all socioeconomic groups but the social class differentials in such exposure remain. The proportion of children who live with a smoker declined in all social groups except the most disadvantaged households, with half of these households still containing a smoker in 2010. More needs to be done to reduce secondhand smoke exposure of children in socially disadvantaged households.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published Online First 30 March 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 10 Feb 2013, 07:22:19 EST by Coral Gartner on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research