Carbon sequestration and soil fertility of tropical tree plantations and secondary forest established on degraded land

Sang, Phan Minh, Lamb, David, Bonner, Mark and Schmidt, Susanne (2013) Carbon sequestration and soil fertility of tropical tree plantations and secondary forest established on degraded land. Plant and Soil, 362 1-2: 187-200. doi:10.1007/s11104-012-1281-9


Author Sang, Phan Minh
Lamb, David
Bonner, Mark
Schmidt, Susanne
Title Carbon sequestration and soil fertility of tropical tree plantations and secondary forest established on degraded land
Journal name Plant and Soil   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-079X
1573-5036
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1281-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 362
Issue 1-2
Start page 187
End page 200
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Abstract Much tropical land requires rehabilitation but the capacity of reforestation with plantations or naturally regenerating secondary forests for overcoming soil degradation remains unclear. We hypothesised that desirable effects, including improved soil fertility and carbon sequestration, are achieved to a greater extent in Acacia mangium plantations and secondary forests than in Eucalyptus urophylla plantations.
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Much tropical land requires rehabilitation but the capacity of reforestation with plantations or naturally regenerating secondary forests for overcoming soil degradation remains unclear. We hypothesised that desirable effects, including improved soil fertility and carbon sequestration, are achieved to a greater extent in Acacia mangium plantations and secondary forests than in Eucalyptus urophylla plantations.

Methods:
We tested our hypothesis across soil and climate gradients in Vietnam with linear mixed-effect models and other, comparing A. mangium and E. urophylla plantations, secondary forests and pasture.

Results: A. mangium plantations and secondary forests showed a positive correlation between biomass production and desirable soils properties including increased soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and reduced bulk density. All plantations, but not secondary forests, caused increases in soil acidity. Eight-year old A. mangium plantations contained most carbon in biomass+soil, and secondary forests and pastures had similar or higher soil carbon. E. urophylla plantations had the lowest soil carbon status, raising doubt about their sequestration capacity in current 6-8 year rotations.

Conclusions: The study demonstrates that appropriate reforestation enhances soil fertility and promotes carbon sequestration on degraded tropical lands and that unmanaged secondary forests are effective at improving soil fertility and sequestering carbon at low cost.
Keyword Acacia mangium
Eucalyptus urophylla
Land rehabilitation
Soil restoration
Aboveground biomass
Land use
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 16 May 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2013 Collection
 
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