Is newborn imitation developmentally homologous to later social-cognitive skills?

Suddendorf, Thomas, Oostenbroek, Janine, Nielsen, Mark and Slaughter, Virginia (2013) Is newborn imitation developmentally homologous to later social-cognitive skills?. Developmental Psychobiology, 55 1: 52-58. doi:10.1002/dev.21005


Author Suddendorf, Thomas
Oostenbroek, Janine
Nielsen, Mark
Slaughter, Virginia
Title Is newborn imitation developmentally homologous to later social-cognitive skills?
Journal name Developmental Psychobiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-1630
1098-2302
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1002/dev.21005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 55
Issue 1
Start page 52
End page 58
Total pages 7
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Abstract To assess claims about developmental homologies, or devologies, longitudinal data are needed. Here, we illustrate this with the debate about the purported foundational role of neonatal imitation in children's social and cognitive development. Cross-sectional studies over the past 35 years have clarified neither the prevalence of imitation in newborns nor its relationships to later developing skills. Thus, scholars have been able to maintain diametrically opposing explanations of neonatal imitation in the literature. Here, we discuss this issue and outline how large-scale longitudinal approaches promise to resolve such debates and have the potential to use individual difference measures to uncover links to later development.
Keyword Infant
Developmental homology
Imitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP 0985969
BCS-1023899
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published online: 19 June 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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